PROFILE

Tom Redd

Global Vice President, Strategic Communications, SAP Global Retail Business Unit

Tom Redd is the Vice President of strategic communications for SAP covering the global retail industry. He leads the team responsible for leveraging the driving internal and external communications via many channels. He is also an internal advisor for SAP Retail’s global marketing across all regions. Tom has been with SAP Retail for 7+ years.

Tom Redd has over 30 years of retail industry experience, ranging from store manager for a small Midwestern shoe chain to POS programmer at NCR in the early 80s. Tom gained notoriety at NCR by driving forward the concept of screen-based POS applications and the development of the first applications for self-service check-in at airports and hotels. This led him to driving third-party POS application development for the NCR POS series and acting President of RetailMate Systems. Tom was also Executive Vice President of Marketing at Reflexis and Vice President of Global Marketing for Retek (now Oracle Retail).

Tom represents SAP Retail as an associate member of National Retail Federation and an active member of the University of Arizona Terry Lundgren Retail Center Executive Board and also a board member for the school’s Norton School of Family Sciences.

Other Links from Tom Redd:

Tom Redd is the Vice President of strategic communications for SAP covering the global retail industry. He leads the team responsible for leveraging the driving internal and external communications via many channels. He is also an internal advisor for SAP Retail’s global marketing across all regions. Tom has been with SAP Retail for 7+ years.

Tom Redd has over 30 years of retail industry experience, ranging from store manager for a small Midwestern shoe chain to POS programmer at NCR in the early 80s. Tom gained notoriety at NCR by driving forward the concept of screen-based POS applications and the development of the first applications for self-service check-in at airports and hotels. This led him to driving third-party POS application development for the NCR POS series and acting President of RetailMate Systems. Tom was also Executive Vice President of Marketing at Reflexis and Vice President of Global Marketing for Retek (now Oracle Retail).

Tom represents SAP Retail as an associate member of National Retail Federation and an active member of the University of Arizona Terry Lundgren Retail Center Executive Board and also a board member for the school’s Norton School of Family Sciences.

Other Links from Tom Redd:

SAP SCN Site-Blogs from Redd

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  • Posted on: 02/24/2017

    Is Amazon’s Alexa a threat to rival retailers?

    Alexa does not stand a chance against a real human. It is a cute little toy that will fade faster than you think. Consumers love the front-end of new trends but they jump off the trend game fast. Treat this Amazon trend like a video game. Some game consoles are a must-have then are a "find them in the closet fast." Like Nintendo Wii and many more.Real life is not like the TV commercials, but some people have to experience it to learn this. Retailers have enough to focus on other than this trendy toy.
  • Posted on: 02/23/2017

    Will dropping double coupons and senior discounts cost Kroger customers?

    Well the other states can give it a try but Senior Day in Arizona is big. The stores are packed and seniors wait for it every month. From the data they pull from this region I am confident that they will stick with their pricing and discounts -- it is the only way that they keep up with Walmart and Safeway and the up-and-comer Sprouts. Scottsdale, AZ is a popular market for retailers. A mix of ages -- with more and more nearing retirement age.
  • Posted on: 02/22/2017

    How long should data consolidation take?

    This set of functions should be in real-time (no matter the size of the operation). Queries should take less than one to three minutes as a maximum -- no matter the size of the consolidated data.The cloud and vertical data storage are key elements required to make this happen. When it does -- as we have seen many times -- it is a joy to watch the user's response.
  • Posted on: 02/21/2017

    Will acquisition of a mom and pop shop pay off big for Kroger?

    Kroger's style of buying, focusing and driving the niche chains works. Our local Fry's chain in Arizona is still local. It is Kroger strong, but still Fry's to even the oldest Arizonians I know. They love the stores/brand/traditions and are not shifting. They live by their Fry's loyalty card and Kroger makes the card even better.Kroger knows how to do it right! Keep up the great work!
  • Posted on: 02/21/2017

    Are Boomers being ignored by retailers?

    Well, all people that know me just know that I love attention. I do think the press (retail and general news) is absorbed with the Millennials and Generation Z. Especially the retail press. Smart retailers are making sure that they define their target markets to include the Baby Boomers and in the Boomers' way.The New York Times and the Wall Street Journal have offerings targeted for Boomers, so why shouldn't retailers? These are not seniors -- they are Boomers. They gave kids Ted Nugent, The Rolling Stones, etc. The are still hip but have less cell phone messaging neck damage and more back damage -- we carried around big bags full of work material instead of little phones or tablets.Retailers: re-think the plan and if Boomers do not know or like you then change that. You need us, especially after Millennials have their first few babies.
  • Posted on: 02/17/2017

    Do consumers want to follow grocers on social media?

    My read is nada. My sample set of data -- my family full of social freaks (except me) -- reports that no way are they food social. So ponder all you want, but the grocery on your social is just not hip.
  • Posted on: 02/17/2017

    Will Dunnhumby’s analytics do for Whole Foods what it did for Kroger?

    Ditto with Paula ... except on the technology refresh. That can help, but tech cannot always repair a brand in the slide, which is what WF is -- a brand that overdid its once unique play. That play is now a norm but their elements -- the negative ones -- are still stuck on them; high prices, shallow assortments, select shoppers. Kroger took the positive from their brand and left the rest.Time will tell, but Kroger is also ahead on food and drink spot in their stores -- another new push that Whole Foods is trying.
  • Posted on: 02/16/2017

    Lidl is ahead of schedule for U.S. store openings

    First, Lidl is a very smart retailer. They have been on the ground in the U.S. for two years or more and know how to fit the food space. This is how they have been so successful in so many countries -- they are running about 10,000 stores at this time. They also have an infrastructure in place that is set to adapt to other countries. They are pros at opening in new regions/countries and mapping assortments to fit these areas. They are unique and will launch at the right time and place. Watch for the launches and enjoy Lidl -- where you can easily find the ketchup you like.
  • Posted on: 02/16/2017

    What will Walmart gain from its Moosejaw acquisition?

    Smart move on both sides. Moosejaw gains from Walmart's reach and strong systems and purchasing channels. Moosejaw also gains from the massive number of sports-oriented shoppers that are loyal to Walmart and have no ego issues with good prices. Many of these negative Moosejaw fans must not understand that Walmart has a large number of high-income shoppers that just want stores to shop in that have decent prices. Here in Scottsdale our Walmart has loads of $80,000 cars in it daily. Walmart gains from it by satisfying its sports customers and expanding its specialty arm.Lots of gains with this move and Moosejaw will always be Moosejaw. Come back in three years and see.
  • Posted on: 02/15/2017

    Is Amazon the most innovative company in retailing?

    Doug, you are right on the money. The only profit for Amazon is their cloud operations. Most retailers do not sell cloud services, nor do they measure retail performance with cloud profits. Fast Company is just another PR channel that Amazon convinced to do a byline on them, and the press ran for it -- as did some of the Millennial BrainTrust members....
  • Posted on: 02/15/2017

    Is Amazon the most innovative company in retailing?

    Nope. Many retailers do not send PR out on their innovative changes. But innovation in retail is truly end to end -- like having 10,000 stores, a massive supply chain network, and complex internal operations -- driving strong margins and customer satisfaction at the same time. Can Amazon do that? No way. Can they self market simple things that are catchy and catch loads of press? Yes.True innovation in a retail world is not about PR. It is about serving your shoppers, no matter the channel and keeping shareholders happy. There are many retailers doing these things, you just do no hear them bragging.
  • Posted on: 02/14/2017

    Will women buy lingerie from Amazon?

    Sure, Millennials buy food and junk from Amazon, why not a bra? Smart ones will not and will go to the specialty store for bras. Some items that you wear have a real purpose and low price is not the focus. Amazon sells everything -- it's close to a huge garage sale or Walmart mixed with a pawn shop. You enjoy the experience with no real relationship development -- just give them money.I am just tired of Amazon and retail reporters promoting the stories that are not worth the read.
  • Posted on: 02/13/2017

    How price competitive does Whole Foods need to be?

    Yes, and match the value. The whole movement is coming to an end soon so people will have healthy food and part of their paycheck left over. Even my Millennial kids do not shop there due to the low value they get out of each dollar. They are health nuts but not brandwashed.
  • Posted on: 02/13/2017

    Should L.L.Bean ditch its legendary return policy?

    Yes, kill the overkill on returns. In the old days of little or no internet people could be trusted and the return policy worked well. But as Boomers grew older and the internet expanded so did crime.It is criminal that L.L. Bean and other retailers pay the price for technology in retail, but tech grows and morals shrink. Kill the policies, save L.L. Bean the costs and your loyal customers will stay with you. Let the criminals or low-moral shoppers look for another sucker. Crime costs us all.
  • Posted on: 02/10/2017

    Will in-home consults give Amazon the keys to the smart home market?

    This step will leave many homeowners wondering why they did it. Why are they doing it? Is it just to be hip? Do these homeowners know the potential problems and hack windows that are still wide open in this new market? Are the service people Amazon is sending in properly vetted? It's easy to add a back door to these installs.I would never allow this in my home or a family member's home. Home automation will become the new hacking ground as more people get the systems and become hip. After they or a friend gets hacked then Amazon will be challenged with many returns.

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