PROFILE

Tom Redd

Global Vice President, Strategic Communications, SAP Global Retail Business Unit

Tom Redd is the Vice President of strategic communications for SAP covering the global retail industry. He leads the team responsible for leveraging the driving internal and external communications via many channels. He is also an internal advisor for SAP Retail’s global marketing across all regions. Tom has been with SAP Retail for 7+ years.

Tom Redd has over 30 years of retail industry experience, ranging from store manager for a small Midwestern shoe chain to POS programmer at NCR in the early 80s. Tom gained notoriety at NCR by driving forward the concept of screen-based POS applications and the development of the first applications for self-service check-in at airports and hotels. This led him to driving third-party POS application development for the NCR POS series and acting President of RetailMate Systems. Tom was also Executive Vice President of Marketing at Reflexis and Vice President of Global Marketing for Retek (now Oracle Retail).

Tom represents SAP Retail as an associate member of National Retail Federation and an active member of the University of Arizona Terry Lundgren Retail Center Executive Board and also a board member for the school’s Norton School of Family Sciences.

Other Links from Tom Redd:

Tom Redd is the Vice President of strategic communications for SAP covering the global retail industry. He leads the team responsible for leveraging the driving internal and external communications via many channels. He is also an internal advisor for SAP Retail’s global marketing across all regions. Tom has been with SAP Retail for 7+ years.

Tom Redd has over 30 years of retail industry experience, ranging from store manager for a small Midwestern shoe chain to POS programmer at NCR in the early 80s. Tom gained notoriety at NCR by driving forward the concept of screen-based POS applications and the development of the first applications for self-service check-in at airports and hotels. This led him to driving third-party POS application development for the NCR POS series and acting President of RetailMate Systems. Tom was also Executive Vice President of Marketing at Reflexis and Vice President of Global Marketing for Retek (now Oracle Retail).

Tom represents SAP Retail as an associate member of National Retail Federation and an active member of the University of Arizona Terry Lundgren Retail Center Executive Board and also a board member for the school’s Norton School of Family Sciences.

Other Links from Tom Redd:

SAP SCN Site-Blogs from Redd

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  • Posted on: 08/31/2016

    Abercrombie is abandoning teenagers

    Smart move. Get away from the low-end, moody, neck bent from phones/gaming Millennial and early Generation Zers. Stick with the gang that is making money. Key with this group is to start carrying a broader line. For guys, add in the affordable sport or travel jackets. The business-casual or hip dinner calls for that jacket and shirts that match in a unique manner. Also add in the men's slacks -- jeans just do not always cut it and you can never have too many pairs! Crank it up AF and go get some market share back!
  • Posted on: 08/30/2016

    Is the Millennial car shopper Amazon’s next big audience?

    OK, cars are my space - but used cars are the smarter investment and most Millennials know this, at least the ones related to me or influenced by me. But I am sure there are the Milennials out there linked to making payments for leasing new cars or buying them.Amazon can be the lead generation tool for the auto dealers, but in selling the cars they will have a peak and then run flat. Strong dealers already do this and they do it well, but they can complete the full sale from online to at-door to post-sale service. Amazon cannot, especially with some brands.Good marketing by Amazon that is more of a test and playtime effort than a play for serious margins. Real people buy cars from pros and negotiate. I ended up with my 2015 truck with perks that you would never get on an online deal. After a walk away from a deal they called back and added what I wanted -- for free. Try that on Amazon, kids.
  • Posted on: 08/29/2016

    How much loyalty do off-pricers have?

    First, the shoppers are loyal, as Monk said, to the PRICE. The off price. The price is first, so TJX needs to keep the prices aligned. Next, the assortment and the right number of surprise items and really great ranges of fits of grand deals need to be aligned. Last is location. People will drive further to have a great discount shopping experience.
  • Posted on: 08/26/2016

    Are wearables on the way out?

    My read -- somewhat psychic -- is that the trendies young and old, jumped on this, ramped it up and we will see a leveling out. Some of the apparel that has embedded technology was spun up fast and is now on sale. The basic step tracking devices bring value to many people -- like cutting insurance costs if they walk a certain amount, etc. But wearables overall to me launched on hype, rode the peak and are leveling out. It will drop a bit and then go stable with a few major players. Also, after IoT has its first major hack all of these areas will drop. I myself will not use IoT technology in my home or wallet (the wallet blocks RFID and other readers). The security is not strong enough yet.
  • Posted on: 08/25/2016

    Does your college freshman have Meijer mania?

    After being around Meijer for years the concept supported by Fred Jr. is solid as a rock. Other retailers are looking for ways to beat it but I am sure it confuses them. Confused about how Meijer gets so deep into the Millennials' minds so that they participate each year. Meijer Mania is a good addiction for kids and families. It saves them all money while they have safe fun. So the parents are really behind it -- call them co-marketers. That is the trick other retailers cannot come up with. These parents trust Meijer and depend on them for all kinds of items -- from food to fishing gear.They are a strong regional tradition and traditions in the Midwest -- or Meijer country -- are very hard to change.
  • Posted on: 08/23/2016

    Why is Apple dropping ‘Store’ from the name of its stores?

    The drop is smart. First, when you walk in the door you know it is a store. I always wondered why Apple had to tell us it was a store. It is a location. A hang out, a union point for Apple freaks.The change will make no huge performance impact and it will make location promotion easier -- say Apple Union Square vs. Apple Store at Union Square. Easier in simple words to know the Apple store location. They may stop saying it but humans (non-Millennials) will still say, "I am headed over to the Apple store for my class on how to use the keyboard."
  • Posted on: 08/22/2016

    Will Amazon drive-up grocery stores disrupt food retailing?

    Neat concept but not effective or simple enough. Especially for fresh items. A majority of the market will still go to a market. Some Millennials and others will jump on this for a few months and then drop it. Just adds another stop to the shopping process.A real grocer has a better shot with this and some already deliver this.Someday the retail press will figure out that Amazon does this stuff for inches of news space -- I estimate that some efforts are funded via the PR budget. Quit falling for the tricks.
  • Posted on: 08/18/2016

    Will Adidas’s Speedfactory disrupt shoe production?

    Look out feet -- Adidas is on the crank up. Shoes are the start, but their rapid adoption of the latest technology will impact the global shoe market and in the future other sportswear areas. It is all about the data and knowledge of what their resellers and actual shoppers want, and leveraging technology to meet the demands.GO ADIDAS GO!
  • Posted on: 08/18/2016

    Is Walmart passing its crime buck to local governments?

    Oh yeah! Another chance for anti-Walmartites to beat on the company that makes life much better for millions. When you run a shop the size of Walmart reacting is tougher than many can imagine. Go beat on GM and the delays in reacting and issuing recalls. What about Tylenol in the old days? What about the e-coli outbreaks? Did they all react fast enough? No, all of these took time to change the structure of operations and build up processes that help them react faster.Low wages -- go away -- Walmart is raising wages and putting opportunities in front of more and more people that do not have jobs. New training, new internal growth plans. They are a strong employer that is improving.The Bloomberg article was very one-sided and somebody at Bloomberg does not like Walmart. Too bad -- Walmart is here to stay and still a place I shop, along with many other people.Keep ranting and raving -- it will not stop Walmart shoppers and we know Walmart is changing!
  • Posted on: 08/17/2016

    Will other brands follow Birkenstock in cutting off Amazon?

    Any manufacturer with a strong brand -- a brand that matters in the purchase of their products -- would never sell on Amazon. Amazon is not a brand-enhancing website. It places great products like Birkenstock next to $9 sandals from some shop in Botswana. That just is not the right way to market a brand. Smart move, Birkenstock!
  • Posted on: 08/16/2016

    Are supermarkets digitally disconnected from retailing reality?

    Grocery needs one thing! A strong cell signal in all parts of the store so people like me can call home and make sure we have the right butter -- unsalted or salted. It kills me that my favorite store has such a weak cell signal and if I have the wrong butter during critical baking months at our home I am DOA.All the other noise on digital, promos and social will come in time as more is needed, but if a store maintains the focus on making sure the shoppers have service out on the floor and product in stock they will do great.In our favorite regional Kroger store -- Fry's -- we have a lady named Mary that has been at the store for more than 20 years. She is now 80 so she works part time. She wanders the floor with the returns re-stock cart and she knows where everything is -- new or basics -- and has advice on any type of cooking or products, like "Mary which of these burritos types is better?" Mary knows and she is right.
  • Posted on: 08/16/2016

    Is Target getting its grocery act together?

    Let's get simple here. Grocery shopping is a tradition in many families. They go to common places for daily stuff, other places to stock up. Target can haul in the best food people out there and carry all the right assortments and get good scale technology -- and last of all, great prices. But tradition is the issue. To really lift the traffic you cannot depend on just Generation X or young Millennials. You need to re-market and shift the Target image. It might range from core media work to shifting store layouts so there are food checkout areas. This is a mental challenge. Walmart did it with time and prices and good ads. Store design also was a major factor. Target can do it -- but I would lock in on a slow, more planned process that Wall Street is not fixated on.
  • Posted on: 08/15/2016

    Does Nordstrom’s growth depend on Nordstrom Rack?

    No. They should support the growth of Rack. It is an extension of the business and in the right cities and locations it is a major retail player. Nordstrom Rack makes Nordstrom a place for more to shop -- high-enders and mid-end channel.The key is to not over-stuff or start creating products for Rack. That ruins the outlet image. Stay true to Rack's focus.
  • Posted on: 08/12/2016

    Are store closings a positive sign for Macy’s?

    Terry has talked about this in the past. This is a re-balancing of the regions. Due to the many stores Macy's acquired they knew there would come a time that they would have to close some. They are also making use of other real estate that they own but do not maximize. It is a smart move as they enhance remaining stores and bring in new technology to the stores, like AI for fashion selection.I get a kick out people that STILL do not like Macy's because of the change to the Marshall Fields store in Chicago. I estimate these shoppers still like Kmart because the name was not changed to Sears. Names do not make a retailer -- their knowledge of their shoppers and the strength of their merchants and ops teams are what make a great retailer.
  • Posted on: 08/10/2016

    Is it OK for brands to have emotions?

    Brands must have and share emotions. I think the brand that does this best -- in relation to margin gains -- is BMW Motorrad (motorcycles). It is amazing what a person (like me) will pay for a BMW vs. a Yamaha. It is about the experience. The motorcycle costs $900 but it does make you feel safer and feel better than others (I have two of them). Millennials who ride are especially quickly captured by BMW. The old riders are fading and BMW is re-working bikes and apparel for the young riders. BMW -- it is the experience.

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