PROFILE

Phil Masiello

Founder and CEO, CrunchGrowth Revenue Acceleration Agency
Expert digital marketer for eCommerce, Mobile Apps and Amazon Marketplace Sellers. Author of "Think-Engage-Thrive: Marketing Actions To Skyrocket Your Brand In The Digital Age." Phil Masiello has founded or co-founded several disruptive business models, focusing at the intersection of emerging digital technologies and consumer lifestyles. Most recently, Phil was the founder and CEO of 800razors.com, an online seller of Made in the USA shaving products for men and women that compare in quality to the national brands at a fraction of the cost and conveniently delivered to your home. Prior to that, Phil co-founded Raw Beauty with former supermodel Carol Alt to market her skin care line Raw Essentials on the television shopping channels, retail and eCommerce. Prior to that, Phil founded The Daily Market Grab and Go Meal Stores, Fabulous Food Stores and several other notable businesses. Phil is an expert business startup builder in the B2C channel with a primary focus on lifestyle, health, beauty and fashion products. Adept at developing effective digital and social strategies and campaigns to build awareness, brand recognition and top line sales growth. For more information, visit <b><a href="https://www.crunchgrowth.com/"> CrunchGrowth Revenue Acceleration website... </a></b>
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  • Posted on: 07/19/2019

    New concept turns retail store into a theatrical experience

    I am always wary of these "theatrical" stores. They certainly get a lot of press and build brand awareness, but they never last because they never drive revenue or profit. I think if you have to "guide" a customer through your store and explain your concept, there is a problem with the store design and the concept.
  • Posted on: 07/18/2019

    What’s the recipe for de-stressing entrepreneurs?

    I founded my first company when I was 27 and have gone on to found several others. All in the consumer products space from food to beauty to shaving and now marketing services. There are two areas where pressure comes into play. First, there is the pressure to grow. As soon as you hire your first employee you take on a responsibility to keep that person employed and to make sure the company has the funds to do it. As you scale, you are under pressure to maintain the growth and the standards for your product. So you have to build a team that can support you. You know that old saying that you have to hire people smarter than you? Yeah. It's garbage. You need to hire people who share your vision for how to achieve success. then everyone is rowing in the same direction. If you hire people smarter than you, then everyone has an opinion and you add the stress of dysfunction. The second place stress comes from is investors. The minute you take your first dollar from an outside investor, you have an obligation to work hard to not lose that investor's money. There are two different types of money to get. Money because you need it quickly and it doesn't matter where it comes from. OR strategic money. Investment from groups that share your vision. If you choose the right investors that will help you grow and achieve success, you will have less stress. If you just take any money that comes your way because you need it and are desperate, you are going to have the added stress of listening to everyone's opinion of what you should be doing everyday. I find the startup process to be exhilarating. But I have learned a valuable lesson and that is to surround yourself with people who share the vision, both internally and externally. This allows you to share the stress.
  • Posted on: 07/12/2019

    Franchisees want McD’s to be more like Chick-fil-A

    McDonald's should not be in a position of chasing rivals. They have the location advantage over all other fast food merchants. But it seems to me that McDonald's lost its advantage over the hamburger to rivals like Five Guys, Shake Shack, Smashburger and Carl's Jr. They should fix that problem first. Chick-fil-A is a chicken fast food merchant and they should be better at chicken. But it seems that customers are going there for more than just chicken as they seem to excel at service. They also excel at speed during busy times. They actually bring their order takers out into the line to move the customers through faster. So, is it the chicken sandwich that is the issue or is Chick-fil-A just a better operator? I think McDonald's should look past the food offering to find the real reason people are going to Chick-fil-A.
  • Posted on: 07/09/2019

    Will a worker walkout put a kink in Amazon’s Prime Day results?

    These types of actions will have little to no effect. And I generally do not pay attention to stories about companies seeded into the press by unions. This is the same type of activities that unions attempted with Walmart several years ago. So they carry little weight in my mind. However, the general public does pay attention to them and believe them. But that won't change the behavior of buying from Amazon. I would expect Amazon to handle it the same way as Walmart had in the past. They will continue to improve conditions and raise worker pay but won't allow unions to gain a foothold.
  • Posted on: 07/08/2019

    Is Walmart at an online crossroads?

    Acquiring unprofitable e-commerce businesses and folding them into an unprofitable infrastructure does not lead to profitability. That only will work when you have built a profitable infrastructure and can fold in other acquisitions to add scale. The Jet.com infrastructure was not profitable and had no chance of ever being profitable. Walmart needs to focus on what it can do best. That is grocery and pharma with both a rapid delivery and curbside pickup mechanism. Trying to move into fashion and other categories where the brand has no credibility is not very good business. Walmart should shut down Jet.com and eliminate non-core e-commerce brands and focus on their core competency.
  • Posted on: 06/26/2019

    Is complaining about customer service becoming America’s national pastime?

    Social media and online review platforms make it easy for customers to vent their frustrations. Many times this is not warranted, but consumers feel empowered by the keyboard. E-tailers and retailers need to have processes in place to stop negative reviews before they happen. This is where a great post purchase email strategy comes into play, no matter where you are selling. A strategy like this will give the consumer a direct line to the company so any issues can be fixed and emotions lowered before the customer leaves a negative review. When a brand does get a negative review online, respond appropriately and empathize with the customer offering up solutions. Do not argue with the customer. This will show anyone reading the negative review how the company handles complaints. No consumer expects a company to be perfect. Just make sure your positive reviews outnumber the negatives by a large margin.
  • Posted on: 06/20/2019

    Kroger sees rivals’ one-hour delivery and raises it a half hour

    There is the promise and there is the ability to execute on that promise. Thirty minute delivery may work sometimes, for some orders. But I would think it would lead to negative PR if they cannot execute it consistently. Think about an order of 25 or 50 items. The pickers need time to process the order, pick the order, bag the order, load the order and deliver the order in the 30 minute window. If they even hit the smallest amount of traffic or get stuck in the red light sequence, the 30 minutes is blown. Customers want a reasonable window of time for an order to be delivered. Certainly one or two hours would be sufficient. Also, Amazon has the infrastructure and backbone of technology to execute on their speed. So trying to "one up" others with even faster delivery could have more negative repercussions than positives.
  • Posted on: 06/18/2019

    Former Snapchat and Quidsi execs come up with possible rival to Amazon

    They have a very long way to go before they can claim to have created a new way to shop. First, they need to get customers to go to their site. But the question I have is, why? If I can buy Boll and Branch sheets, for example, directly from the retailer and Amazon and some other online retailers, why do I need Verishop? Everyone is offering free shipping in all sorts of variations. What is the value proposition of Verishop? Curation? I don't think that is enough. Influencer endorsements? I think consumers have already discounted this value because they know they are paid for. The obstacle here is, what does Verishop have that is unique and will make me want to shop there and what is their value proposition?
  • Posted on: 06/12/2019

    Has Barnes & Noble found its savior(s)?

    I certainly believe B&N would be better served by someone in the book industry. We have already seen the effects of the PE consolidation of an industry. I think there would be another Toys "R" Us debacle if B&N chose a fund over a book distributor.
  • Posted on: 06/10/2019

    Walmart debuts store-to-fridge fresh food delivery service

    The obstacle has always been trust with these services. You can go back to the '90s with a startup called Streamline, which provided the refrigerators and placed them in garages so they did not need to enter the house. It was never able to scale because of trust. Consumers don't like having people they do not know walking around their property when they are not there. It is not about the delivery person doing something unethical at the time of delivery. It is about visually scanning the home for some future endeavor. Regardless of the video security and smart locks, these services are still struggling. However, I do believe that Amazon will be able to penetrate this market faster and more securely than Walmart. Amazon has the trust of the consumer regardless of the third party delivery or direct employees. Customers trust Amazon to deliver their purchases above the USPS, Fedex and UPS.
  • Posted on: 06/05/2019

    Are Wegmans, Giant Eagle and Tops wise to drop in-store childcare?

    This is purely an economic decision. If these spaces are not being used by the customers, then certainly the space can be converted back to selling and generate revenue. Also this is probably affecting the insurance liability coverage for the store. As a parent, I would be hesitant to leave my child in one of these spaces and I am sure others are as well. When you throw in the threats of shootings occurring at a more rapid rate, this could be a source of anxiety for modern parents.
  • Posted on: 05/29/2019

    Amazon to set small suppliers adrift

    Let's not misinterpret this. There is the vendor relationship (1P) where these companies were selling a product to Amazon and Amazon was the seller to the consumer. Then there is the seller relationship (3P) where the companies list their own products on Amazon and the brand is the actual seller to the consumer. What Amazon is doing is reducing the 1P side and allowing these companies to sell on the 3P side. So the brands can still sell, just not to Amazon, but directly to the consumer. It is actually better for the brands as they have more control over pricing, brand messaging and the consumer experience. The other side to this is the elimination of some less than stellar sellers who have been gaming the system and causing brand damage to larger brands. So brands like Nike, P&G brands and others become "gated." Whereby only certain sellers are allowed to sell them. This reduces counterfeit products, unethical sellers and poor performers. Brands should be taking advantage of the 3P marketplace and selling directly to the consumer. It gives them more control over their brand.
  • Posted on: 05/21/2019

    When the going gets tough, the tough get transparent

    I think customers are well aware that mistakes happen. It is how a company deals with the mistake that reinforces trust. Truthfulness and transparency are always the best way. Let customers know what happened, why it happened and what you are doing about it. However, I would refrain from patting oneself on the back for doing the right thing. It should be expected.
  • Posted on: 05/13/2019

    What’s wrong with the (fill in the blank) category?

    You said it best. Decisions are made based upon slotting, rebates, discounts, and accruals. Retailers, especially supermarkets, don't make decisions based upon what is good for the customer. Retailers need to focus on customer-centric decision making, not on short term gross margin funding props.
  • Posted on: 05/09/2019

    Will Schick parent’s acquisition of Harry’s create a ‘next-generation consumer products platform’?

    It is a great move for EPC. Clearly, their acquisition strategy over the last few years with Bull Dog, Jack Black and now Harry's, is to better position the company for future consumers. This is a game changer and will remove Gillette's dominance over time.

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