PROFILE

Matt Sebek

VP, Digital Experiences at WWT
As the Vice President of Digital at World Wide Technology (WWT), Matt helps Fortune 1000 brands dream and develop delightful consumer and workforce experiences through human-centered design, insight-driven objectivity and the unique ability to understand and eliminate the challenges that exist between the Business and IT. He has been instrumental in creating some of the most-used and highest-rated QSR, B2C and Fast Casual Restaurant digital experiences over the past five years.

To learn more, visit: wwt.com
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  • Posted on: 04/04/2018

    Should retailers lower expectations around last-mile delivery?

    This is all about providing options. We are nearing a critical inflection point on the supply/demand curve of last-mile shipping, whereby customers will have to pay a premium for certain delivery times. With every retailer raising last-mile expectations, the current model is not sustainable -- for retailers, postal services or the customer. This will require postal services to get better with real-time logistics/data to allow retailers/customers to choose exact delivery times -- and to pay dynamic rates for the respective slot and the exactness that comes from it. Under this model, it becomes less about the expectation of matching Amazon’s benchmarks.
  • Posted on: 04/03/2018

    Walmart is focused on expanding its digital brand portfolio

    Walmart's moves may not contain a common thread that exposes a central strategy, but that doesn't necessarily predict failure (or success). Walmart's acquisitions cross a variety of formats, demographics and channels. They're relying on their buying power, scale and cash infusion to move these companies in a positive direction. Oddly, their strategy is probably most aligned with Netflix, who provides both resources and autonomy to young producers to build their own product. Walmart is investing in their own platforms while also providing tentacles of innovation in the form of somewhat unrelated acquisitions. Admirable.
  • Posted on: 03/28/2018

    Are Amazon lockers turning Whole Foods into a quick shop destination?

    Yes, Amazon/Whole Foods and every other retailer will benefit from micro lockers (even if those micro lockers simply store first-party products). The elephant in the room is that postal services are already at capacity and a dynamic pricing model is a very real possibility in the supply-and-demand of "same day delivery" services. Under these conditions, "Buy Online, Pickup in Store" and curb-side delivery will become an essential part of every retail business -- independent of impulse purchases or not.
  • Posted on: 03/26/2018

    Has Facebook become toxic for advertisers?

    Facebook is still way too big for advertisers to abandon. Rather than letting newsfeed algorithms exploit users to achieve opaque goals (such as swaying political opinions), I am eager to see companies that begin to put the user in control of the goals that their algorithms optimize for. Facebook could do this tomorrow. And it would be valuable for all involved -- advertisers, Facebook itself -- and most importantly, users.
  • Posted on: 03/23/2018

    In this digital revolution, stores are media

    "Engagement channel" is probably more accurate than "media channel." Brick-and-mortar still exists as an engagement channel for the brand. Always has. What's been abstracted is the point-of-transaction necessity. For many retailers, the ability to exist solely in the digital space is a reality. However, as the retail vertical over-calibrates to this mentality, it has potential to become the new commoditization; hence, why we're seeing brands such as Frank And Oak and Bonobos open showrooms that emphasize non-transactional elements of their brand such as culture, experience and the tangible differentiators of their product.
  • Posted on: 03/21/2018

    How personal can Target’s customer service get?

    Investments in people and technology are not mutually exclusive. They complement each other. Target is building an underbelly of technological capabilities and they (obviously) are smart to to invest in customer service. BUT it will be interesting to see when/if Target joins these swim lanes (e.g., assisted selling, AR/VR, automatic detection of customer personas and notification to the "right" expert).
  • Posted on: 03/16/2018

    Amazon/Whole Foods planning store pickup service from third-party retailers

    The intuitive advantages to Whole Foods (and Amazon) are apparent, but relatively soft. Sure, there will be an increase in foot traffic and basket size at Whole Foods; for instance, a customer picking up a power drill also needs a bunch of bananas. However, as is the case with Amazon, this is all about the long play. They're surrounding the customer outside the four walls of retail by creating a one-stop digital and physical shop for their products as well as other brands. In doing so, they continue to commoditize other brick-and-mortar businesses and gain leverage over brands whom customers are already demanding same day delivery and/or pickup options. There are major brands that will have no option, but to participate in this partner program.
  • Posted on: 03/07/2018

    Target looks to out-people competition

    For the last five years, brands have over-calibrated on digital customer experience. It has created significant disparities between customers walking into a store and the people working there. Simply, brands have to differentiate themselves in traditional brick-and-mortar stores by providing a delightful, human experiences that consumers simply cannot find online (e.g., real-time dashboards, information about customers pre/during/post visit, homegrown PoS systems). I admire Target's multifaceted approach to their growth plan both inside their stores and outside their four walls (through acquisitions like Shipt).

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