PROFILE

Ian Percy

President, The Ian Percy Corporation

Ian Percy is a Possibilities Expert and the founder of The Infinite Possibilities Initiative, a process for applying principles from quantum and energetic science for exponentially higher levels of innovation and profitability. An organizational psychologist, he is one of the most acclaimed business and inspirational speakers in the world. Successful Meetings magazine declared him “One of the top 21 speakers for the 21st century” and he is one of only three speakers inducted into both the US and Canadian Speaker Halls of Fame. Ian’s remarkable ability to blend depth of insight with inspiration is sought after by a wide variety of corporations and associations.

Recently he’s developed a process that engages entire cities in ‘possibility thinking’ and in understanding that they control the collective ‘energy’ that attracts or repels new residents, investments and businesses. Many organizations are stuck in 16th century Newtonian thinking, he insists, and that makes them almost irrelevant to a 21st century marketplace. For starters, he says, we need to move far beyond ‘problem solving’ to ‘seeing possibilities’. When leaders focus on the latter, problems resolve themselves and a new and prosperous reality begins to emerge. That is the secret to building a culture of innovation!

In addition Ian is a co-founder of Verdant Technologies LLC, a company that brings advanced technologies to many sectors like sustainable energy, waste management, agriculture, water science, medical devices, electric vehicles. etc.

He has authored seven highly respected books including the breakthrough book on leadership titled: Going Deep and The Profitable Power of Purpose which challenges traditional thinking about corporate vision. His latest ebook is Make Your Life a Masterpiece, a modern English translation of James Allen’s 1902 classic As a Man Thinketh.

Ian has both Canadian and US citizenships and lives in Scottsdale, Arizona.

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  • Posted on: 05/23/2018

    Best Buy’s Geek Squad is now available by subscription

    It will take a little time to validate the Best Buy model, you are right about that, Ed. But frankly, I don't know how they will make money at $199.99 a year. The equivalent of $17 a month, IMO, is a huge bargain. What is that, three visits to Starbucks a month? For the whole year that's about three hours of an expert's time if you hired them directly. I just wish my technology worked as well as yours!
  • Posted on: 05/23/2018

    Best Buy’s Geek Squad is now available by subscription

    You are right, Chris. As I mentioned in my post, we've had remote service for all our computers for over 10 years, nothing new here though you are right in saying this will only grow. And our service (MyComputerWorks.com) is based right here in Phoenix as are most of their technicians. No need to go offshore.
  • Posted on: 05/23/2018

    Best Buy’s Geek Squad is now available by subscription

    This should be a very successful initiative for Best Buy -- that is IF the numbers work. We've had our computers on a similar "remote access" service for a long time and it's been the most worthwhile subscription program ever -- for us. There's been occasions where the computer guy has had to work for hours solving a problem or helping me move from an old laptop to a new one. The fact that Best Buy covers "all" electronics and appliances seems a little shallow to me given there is no remote access to my TV or refrigerator -- yet. And a geek telling me to do this and that over a phone would drive me nuts. The big challenge, it seems to me, is the credibility of the Geek Squad. How expert are they really? My early experience with Geek Squad sure wasn't very reassuring. For much less money I have access to a MAC specialist who I regard with awe.
  • Posted on: 05/21/2018

    eBay asks consumers what they want

    The topics today were starting to aggravate me. Stephen, your third point has saved the day! Thank you. May that possibility become a welcomed reality.
  • Posted on: 05/21/2018

    eBay asks consumers what they want

    This is much the same topic as the item about consumer revolt about being data generators. Why has retail concluded that they are responsible for "personalizing" our shopping experience? The only one who can accurately personalize you is you! If I'm looking for something on eBay I type it in the search bar. Presto, there it is. Brilliant, huh? Here's the the thing. No technology is capable of knowing or predicting what I may be looking for tomorrow. That's why when we buy something we get inundated with ads for the thing we just bought. Technology is always behind it seems to me; it deals only with history. At least in retail. Right now I'm looking for something for the olive tree in my back yard because the bark seems to be cracking and shedding. Personalize that, eBay!
  • Posted on: 05/21/2018

    Will greater transparency drive a digital targeting backlash?

    There is so much disdain and condescension toward customers going on. Because I'm involved somewhat in the agriculture world, I keep getting the image of us being like hens or piglets jammed into unnatural environments generating data with every breath we take. There was a Starbucks item on RetailWire a while back that showed we can't even get a cup of coffee without becoming data. Even the comment that people “don’t always behave logically ... " is nonsense. Just whose "logic" are we talking about here? This whole thing is aimed at how to make us chickens and piglets think this constant analysis is actually good for us. The brutal truth is we're being used. It is time to revolt!
  • Posted on: 05/11/2018

    The importance of prioritizing high(er)-value customers

    My thoughts are much in keeping with yours, Art. I'd add "Listen to ALL your customers." The tendency is to assume the occasional customer isn't worth listening to while we drool over the frequent customer. Both deserve a "wow."
  • Posted on: 05/11/2018

    The importance of prioritizing high(er)-value customers

    While working with a bank as they laid out a customer ranking/prioritizing strategy, my one ignored piece of advice was: "Never let your customer's see your prioritizing strategy." It's the old watching the sausage-maker story. Even with this perfectly reasonable article I doubt anyone reading it felt misty with the love being shown. As usual, the story ends with "...and maximum ROI." There's a TV commercial that says "First Class exists to remind you you're not in First Class." Of course every retailer wants to make as much money as possible by serving its customers well. The quicksand lies in the word "prioritize." When you start to differentiate your customer by "precedence in right or rank" as the word is defined, you end up on a slippery slope. My pet peeve, as an example, are airlines who stupidly have two carpet runners heading into the gate. One has a sign for "Priority" customers and the other for riffraff. Both are made from the same material, both are filthy ... and they are right beside each other! "Differentiate" would be a better word. Learn to provide each customer what they want and need from you. No one is more important in the moment than the occasional shopper standing in front of you. And no one is more important in the moment than the frequent customer standing in front of you. Aim to provide slightly more than what each one expects.
  • Posted on: 05/04/2018

    New Brookstone concept brings makers to the mall

    Georgeanne, I could not be more aligned with you in your annoyance of "products" that exist only in someone's mind. Some time back on RetailWire I commented on my experience looking for a particular medical device only to find time and again what appeared to be real...wasn't. Things that are CAD should be accompanied by a disclaimer: "This product exists only in my imagination."
  • Posted on: 05/04/2018

    New Brookstone concept brings makers to the mall

    "Nothing happens until somebody BUYS something!" Anything we can do to encourage inventive minds should be done. It should start in the first grade IMO. So I agree with my colleagues that this is a truly good thing and kudos to ACE, Lowe's, etc. for supporting the cause. In the end it's far more than attracting people into the store to see innovative products. If I've got hours to kill in an airport Brookstone is the first place I go. In more than four decades I've never bought a darn thing. The end-game here has to be a purchase or all this innovation is for naught. Solve that problem, Brookstone and you live long and prosper.
  • Posted on: 04/30/2018

    Walgreens tests lower prices, membership savings

    Your assessment is much more informed than mine, Rich. And probably because I'm a transplanted Canadian who'd never heard of Walgreens until moving to the US, it seemed more like a large convenience store than what I thought of as a drugstore. As I understand it, about 70% of Walgreens' revenue is from script fulfillment so clearly it's mostly a drugstore. You are right about pricing too. Here in AZ there was an online piece about Walgreens charging $198.80 for pills that cost just $14.87 at Costco.
  • Posted on: 04/30/2018

    Walgreens tests lower prices, membership savings

    Tom, your "on the right side of the street" comment is brilliantly obvious. Gets past all the BS to the bare truth. Immediately reminded me of the old saying "The attendance at your funeral will depend on the weather." Sometimes we need to return to the simple constructs. Well said.
  • Posted on: 04/30/2018

    Walgreens tests lower prices, membership savings

    I've already submitted my bit on this subject, Rich, but your comment triggered another thought. "Drug stores cost more" is a legacy-meme from way back when we thought they were staffed by credentialed professionals and were more medically-focused than your run-of-the-mill variety store. A real "pharmacy" in other words. But do people today really think of Walgreens as a "pharmaceutical store?" Given that I can get prescriptions filled and buy most OTC products in the same place I buy celery, I think "drugs stores" per se are doomed.
  • Posted on: 04/30/2018

    Walgreens tests lower prices, membership savings

    I just don't understand why the only arrow in retail's competitive quiver is to lower prices. Each time this comes up it makes headlines like it's some new and insightful strategy. Cutting back on SKUs makes sense. Years ago I consulted to a drugstore chain in Canada that had well over 300 brands of perfumes. They used to brag about that. However, most of them had been sitting on the shelf longer than anyone could remember. As I recall, somewhere around 10 percent of the brands were ever purchased. It may be an old song, but I keep coming back to ACE Hardware whose strategy seems to be "provide knowledgeable service beyond expectation." My trips to Home Depot "to save money" have been cut back by about 75 percent. I'm happy to pay more. And yes, ACE has a membership thing but I don't bother with it. That's not where the value is.
  • Posted on: 04/20/2018

    Walmart ditching khakis for jeans in dress code test

    I've seen that same passenger on a plane, Al ... and even worse. What people wear in public and even in restaurants, weddings, funerals, etc. is, IMHO, sad. That's why I mentioned the pleasure of being in Europe where they still, for the most part, still dress for dinner. True, no one has ever had a good idea while wearing a tie, but still. I have a friend who's been taking a formal and professional studio pictures of homeless people. When they see themselves in this new light something happens inside. Everyone of them has come out of homelessness, found a job, home and so on. Take a look here. Walmart should be looking for ways to raise the self-esteem and pride of their employees ... not lower it.

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