PROFILE

Ian Percy

President, The Ian Percy Corporation

Ian Percy is a Possibilities Expert and the founder of The Infinite Possibilities Initiative, a process for applying principles from quantum and energetic science for exponentially higher levels of innovation and profitability. An organizational psychologist, he is one of the most acclaimed business and inspirational speakers in the world. Successful Meetings magazine declared him “One of the top 21 speakers for the 21st century” and he is one of only three speakers inducted into both the US and Canadian Speaker Halls of Fame. Ian’s remarkable ability to blend depth of insight with inspiration is sought after by a wide variety of corporations and associations.

Recently he’s developed a process that engages entire cities in ‘possibility thinking’ and in understanding that they control the collective ‘energy’ that attracts or repels new residents, investments and businesses. Many organizations are stuck in 16th century Newtonian thinking, he insists, and that makes them almost irrelevant to a 21st century marketplace. For starters, he says, we need to move far beyond ‘problem solving’ to ‘seeing possibilities’. When leaders focus on the latter, problems resolve themselves and a new and prosperous reality begins to emerge. That is the secret to building a culture of innovation!

In addition Ian is a co-founder of Verdant Technologies LLC, a company that brings advanced technologies to many sectors like sustainable energy, waste management, agriculture, water science, medical devices, electric vehicles. etc.

He has authored seven highly respected books including the breakthrough book on leadership titled: Going Deep and The Profitable Power of Purpose which challenges traditional thinking about corporate vision. His latest ebook is Make Your Life a Masterpiece, a modern English translation of James Allen’s 1902 classic As a Man Thinketh.

Ian has both Canadian and US citizenships and lives in Scottsdale, Arizona.

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  • Posted on: 01/28/2022

    Walmart shoppers find time is well spent in new incubator store

    Seems like forever I've been critical of retail's goal of getting the customer out of the store as fast as possible. Walmart must read RW! The intent of making the store interesting can't help but be a winning strategy. And, yes, it may take a while to figure out how to do that effectively, but it is a worthy endeavor. "Simple Fascination" is the secret. Making it too complicated and technical will be the idea killer. FWIW ... I feel the same way about the idea that everything has to be on one page or executives won't read it. The sad assumption is our brains can't handle anything more than that. The "one-page-strategy" only works if the writing is boring. We are innately creative beings which formal education has pretty well destroyed. Make things interesting and we awaken the customers we need!
  • Posted on: 01/21/2022

    Will airbags calm fears about driverless vehicles?

    Feel your pain, Zel. "Bumpers" aren't bumpers anymore, they are radar systems.
  • Posted on: 01/21/2022

    Will airbags calm fears about driverless vehicles?

    As a currently horse-less horse guy, Kevin, I desperately miss those horses!
  • Posted on: 01/21/2022

    Will airbags calm fears about driverless vehicles?

    A 500-pound+ vehicle that can travel up to 25 miles an hour has an air mattress front and back that will "soften the impact" when it hits someone or something. How reassuring. Air bags can save your life, but they're going to hurt. A friend had a less than 5 mph accident bumping into a car that stopped suddenly in front of him. Cost of repair to one vehicle was about $5,000 by the time all the technology in the "bumper" was replaced and recalibrated. Why didn't the auto-stop tech work? Because I (oops, "he") wasn't going fast enough. I don't think this is ready for prime time yet.
  • Posted on: 12/20/2021

    What happens when D2C brands diversify product lines?

    Your caveat is the key, Jeff. Is there alignment or coherency with the starting point? I'm not so sure that many brands build on a working awareness of just what the "brand promise" is.
  • Posted on: 12/20/2021

    What happens when D2C brands diversify product lines?

    There are ways to diversify; some work and some won't. The simple key can be seen in both the Allbirds and Warby Parker examples, at least it appears so. The principle I suggest is: Congruent Diversity. Or to put it another way -- stay in your lane but don't be afraid to strategically broaden it as profitably as possible. As I learned from Sesame Street, if one of your D2C products is not like the others, you are already on the slippery slope. Warby Parker expanding into hearing aids isn't congruent nor is Allbirds expanding into dietary supplements. That is unless they redefine their lane which can be even more hazardous. This is the old "are you in the train business or the transportation business" concept, the implication of which isn't as wise as it used to be.
  • Posted on: 12/16/2021

    Do farmers markets need to be reinvented for the digital age?

    Only a few responses are posted as I type this and I couldn't agree more with all of them. Is nothing sacred any more? Do we not realize that Nature has all we need to be well and happy? Do we think that somehow touching and consuming what Nature and the passion of a farmer brings to our table isn't a divine gift? There is something irreplaceable about looking the person in the eye and taking from their hand what they grew, baked or made. Compare that experience to a soulless digital platform.
  • Posted on: 12/15/2021

    Print catalogs help customers unplug for the holidays

    I couldn't agree with you more Patricia! I don't know of any shopping websites that are inviting, inspiring or provide a break from reality. They've changed "reality" into something cold, functional and robotic.
  • Posted on: 12/15/2021

    Print catalogs help customers unplug for the holidays

    Well, I am a little biased toward catalogs. In her earlier modeling days my wife and her girlfriends dominated the Sears, Eaton's and other catalogs in Canada for years. Forty years later she's still hot! But I digress. Many retailers follow the crowd, unfortunately. The value of sifting through a catalog while having a glass of hot mulled wine, sitting in the big chair in front of the fireplace will never be replaced by squinting at a screen. I feel the same way about real books. Calling them "hard" copies doesn't make any sense to me. There is nothing like the soft feel of cotton fiber paper, touching the words that came from the heart and mind of the writer, marveling at good design and so on. If those qualities could be infused into a catalog -- I vote yes on catalogs. And Merry Christmas to all.
  • Posted on: 11/12/2021

    Frontline workers say management isn’t listening to them

    I'm having a deja vu moment all over again. This issue is what started my consulting and speaking business back in 1971. My research from earlier days found consistently that as you went through the organizational ranks starting with the C-suite down to cleaning folks and entry level people the satisfaction with being heard, etc. dropped to the negative by 10 percent at each level. And I apologize for using the phrase "down to." Because it is the "down to" folks that have the greatest insight into the reality of the circumstances. The principle I preached for a long time was "When people plan the battle, they don't battle the plan." Failure to meaningfully engage people - that means more than listening, it means actually acting on what you hear - always leads to demise.
  • Posted on: 10/26/2021

    Can retailers wean consumers off discounts this holiday season?

    Shep Hyken is right about the perpetual discount philosophy being a self-inflicted wound. Unfortunately it is a wound that is not healing. There is a phase between a current reality and a desired reality that I call the "shuddering." This happens when we are required to break through a barrier to get to a promised land on the other side. Most organizations (and governments) don't have the courage to pay the price. It hurts. It's scary. And you become very unsure that you'll survive. This is precisely why we have so many societal ills that could have been solved a long time ago if we'd only had the courage. The whole COVID-19 thing is a good example. So many simply couldn't handle the "shuddering" of wearing masks, seclusion, social distancing and getting a shot. They wrap it up in "freedom" terminology rather than admit it is little more than fear. In my opinion, the question really is "How much courage does retail have to go through the shuddering it's facing?"
  • Posted on: 09/07/2021

    Why can’t CMOs And CIOs just get along?

    You went where I dared not go, Andrew. You are so right - there is never isolated non-collaboration as in marketing vs IT. In far too many cases you could take an organizational chart and write "vs" between every box. When ALL the energy within an organization becomes aligned and passionately focused on turning their highest possibilities into reality, they become invincible. Collaboration becomes as effortless as breathing.
  • Posted on: 09/07/2021

    Why can’t CMOs And CIOs just get along?

    Since the beginning of time, the "team motto" for almost all corporations is "every department for itself!" You can't "drive" collaboration, you can only create a circumstance that invites it. Only when you're not driving do you get to see and appreciate what's all around you. The old pyramid structure in which every interest has to fight for itself and where the executive group administers both carrots and sticks assumes that collaboration (aka teamwork), performance and profitability - indeed leadership itself - are simply mechanical processes. In truth, the desire for common unity where one of marketing's primary goals is the success of technology and vice versa is a matter of vision, spirit, heart, emotion and love. We get nervous with those words so we call it "culture" a word that, once again, tries to mechanize the challenge. We get so consumed driving collaboration we forget to establish the "Why?" Like throwing the family into the car for a long trip without telling them where.
  • Posted on: 09/01/2021

    Ending prices that end in 99 cents

    In reference to your "way back in the day" comment, Gene: The .99 cent idea began in 1860. And the nine-tenths addition to gas prices I mention on this thread was the result of a federal tax implemented in 1932 as part of the Revenue Act of 1932. Back then, apparently, a full penny more was a deal-breaker. That "tax" was supposed to expire in 1934. What does all this say about us?
  • Posted on: 09/01/2021

    Ending prices that end in 99 cents

    I'm surprised that no one is mentioning the price of gas game. $2.85 and nine-tenths is ridiculous but the industry has successfully hidden that last nine-tenths from consumer conciousness. And that is brilliant if annoying. "How much did you pay for gas at Costco?" my wife asks. An incorrect answer is $2.85. Where else among retail products could we do that? Has to be an oft-repeated purchase in order to make it invisible. If you're going to try it on milk or bread for example, make sure the "nine-tenths" part is very tiny.

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