PROFILE

Ian Percy

President, The Ian Percy Corporation

Ian Percy is a Possibilities Expert and the founder of The Infinite Possibilities Initiative, a process for applying principles from quantum and energetic science for exponentially higher levels of innovation and profitability. An organizational psychologist, he is one of the most acclaimed business and inspirational speakers in the world. Successful Meetings magazine declared him “One of the top 21 speakers for the 21st century” and he is one of only three speakers inducted into both the US and Canadian Speaker Halls of Fame. Ian’s remarkable ability to blend depth of insight with inspiration is sought after by a wide variety of corporations and associations.

Recently he’s developed a process that engages entire cities in ‘possibility thinking’ and in understanding that they control the collective ‘energy’ that attracts or repels new residents, investments and businesses. Many organizations are stuck in 16th century Newtonian thinking, he insists, and that makes them almost irrelevant to a 21st century marketplace. For starters, he says, we need to move far beyond ‘problem solving’ to ‘seeing possibilities’. When leaders focus on the latter, problems resolve themselves and a new and prosperous reality begins to emerge. That is the secret to building a culture of innovation!

In addition Ian is a co-founder of Verdant Technologies LLC, a company that brings advanced technologies to many sectors like sustainable energy, waste management, agriculture, water science, medical devices, electric vehicles. etc.

He has authored seven highly respected books including the breakthrough book on leadership titled: Going Deep and The Profitable Power of Purpose which challenges traditional thinking about corporate vision. His latest ebook is Make Your Life a Masterpiece, a modern English translation of James Allen’s 1902 classic As a Man Thinketh.

Ian has both Canadian and US citizenships and lives in Scottsdale, Arizona.

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  • Posted on: 05/16/2019

    Why does loyalty program ROI remain so murky?

    Yup though it's in the definition of those terms that things get messed up. And you hit the bullseye by suggesting that what is really being measured is "customer value. " Loyalty is a quality attributed to a customer while "customer value" is purely from the retailer's perspective.
  • Posted on: 05/16/2019

    Why does loyalty program ROI remain so murky?

    I agree with both you and Shep, Lauren...though I'd go a step further. True loyalty exists only in the absence of discounts and freebies.
  • Posted on: 05/16/2019

    Why does loyalty program ROI remain so murky?

    "Loyalty programs are operational structures put on top of something worth being loyal to in the first place." may be the most brilliant insight we see all day, Joanna. Until retailers have a response to the latter part of the statement, there is no point working on the first part. We are persistent in putting cart before horse.
  • Posted on: 05/16/2019

    Why does loyalty program ROI remain so murky?

    The reason "loyalty ROI" is so murky is that you are not measuring loyalty! This is like measuring base hits while watching a basketball game. As has been said over and over in this space, the loyalty battle was lost and abandoned decades ago. There is no such thing in current retail reality. What retail is trying to measure is OPPORTUNISM. Shoppers will drop you like a hot rock if another store saves them a mere 5 percent or 10 percent more than you offered. Every time sales promotions show up in junk mail, shoppers look for the best opportunities. They are not thinking about being loyal to anyone other than themselves. The wicked question that needs to be asked is this? "What is there to be loyal to in any given retail circumstance?" Loyalty is a social or even a spiritual decision, NOT a mechanistic one. You can't measure love on a spreadsheet!
  • Posted on: 05/08/2019

    Will Walmart’s new online pet pharmacy and vet clinics draw more pet parents?

    You are right ... who knew? We discovered Costco as a source of pet meds by accident, thank goodness!
  • Posted on: 05/08/2019

    Will Walmart’s new online pet pharmacy and vet clinics draw more pet parents?

    A yes regarding prescriptions and a not sure regarding veterinarian care. When our dog had to go on medication for Valley Fever for about six months, we discovered Costco was where to go to fill the prescription. Much, much cheaper than anywhere else. No reason why Walmart shouldn't be in this space as well. When our favorite, most trusted vet moved almost an hour away, my wife considered that extra driving time well worth it. But a lot of people will still be glad for local and less costly pet care. I'm waiting to see if Walmart vet clinics are, in fact, less expensive. Reading this article I also began to wonder if we'll see an over-medication of pets as we do with so many doctors and humans.
  • Posted on: 05/02/2019

    Is retail suffering from an emotional intelligence deficit?

    To Georganne, Cathy, et al ... it really isn't all that complicated, is it! Reminds me of Tim Sanders' book "Love is the Killer App." Also reminds me of presidential candidate Marianne Williamson 's efforts to "turn love into a political force." We should be able to do the same thing in retail!
  • Posted on: 05/02/2019

    Is retail suffering from an emotional intelligence deficit?

    I absolutely understand Mr. Guy's point when he says: "We are entering an age where emotional intelligence is becoming more important,” However, the truth is Adam and Eve could have used a little more "emotional intelligence." Knowing how to relate to our world and all that lives within it has always been the main and timeless challenge in learning how to be fully human. What we're finally realizing is that we've abdicated that responsibility to technology. The only thing we'll ever get from technology is information. Even fast and brilliant information has no soul. It's spiritual enlightenment that we're missing. First that "light" has to shine within and then it can shine without. Sadly, you know that someone will (or has) come up with an "emotional intelligence" app. To paraphrase de Chardin, someday, once we have mastered technology, then perhaps for a second time we will discover fire. May that come in time.
  • Posted on: 04/25/2019

    Will Rite Aid and Walgreens gain health cred by restricting tobacco sales?

    Thank you my Canadian brother. Excellent point...maybe there is value in finding a higher purpose!
  • Posted on: 04/25/2019

    Will Rite Aid and Walgreens gain health cred by restricting tobacco sales?

    I just want to be clear -- are we asking if making even a dent in the 433,000 U.S. citizens who die from tobacco-related diseases every year, 90 percent of whom started down that road as teenagers, will lead to business benefits? Gosh, have to think about that. Will get right back to you.
  • Posted on: 04/24/2019

    Should retailers promote brand backstories?

    :)
  • Posted on: 04/24/2019

    Should retailers promote brand backstories?

    You are exactly right re poor copy, Georganne. This is why I suggested saving space and making more impact with a picture. For example if, beside a stack of elderberry pies, a sign had an old picture of an elderly lady baking in her kitchen with the caption "'Nana' Jean Flowers created this famous pie recipe in 1923," I could even fact check it right there and head to checkout with a dozen of them!
  • Posted on: 04/24/2019

    Should retailers promote brand backstories?

    There's a story behind everything in the universe and, indeed, the universe itself. The more you know the story the better your position to make a decision. Unfortunately, "story" is often equated with something made up, something false. True stories are what our world needs right now but gosh are they hard to come by. There's been no mention of the visual dimension of story. That can be more powerful than words. Remember one of them equals 1,000 of those. For example, when I quote someone in a presentation, a visual of that quote always includes a picture of that individual. Makes quite a difference. We all know what Einstein or Tesla looked like but what about Walter Russell or Kahlil Gibran? "Seeing" them express their brilliant wisdom makes a big difference. What did Burt Shavitz or Jerome Smucker look like? That's part of the story too.
  • Posted on: 04/02/2019

    Which data sources should be driving personalization?

    Oh Nikki, you seem to think that "personalization" is actually about being personal. People talking to each other, showing genuine interest in the customer and that sort of thing. That is so old-school. We're in the "Give me data or give me death" age. Sadly many retailers will get both because they won't listen to you. I just wish I'd made my contribution today as eloquently as you did! Thank you!
  • Posted on: 04/02/2019

    Which data sources should be driving personalization?

    When we get into topics like this one about "data" and retail's desperation to understand the human being, every cell of my body cringes. I do try to understand, I really do. It's just that nothing could be more opposite to being "personal" than this kind of thinking. This is not a criticism of Tom's article at all, he's reporting very clearly on what is actually happening. We need a "personalization strategy?" Really? Isn't personalization an innate part of being human? Who would say to someone "I'd really like to get to know you. Please tell me about your recent purchases, email activity and mobile actions." Some are moving as far from being personal as possible by going to third-party data. And look at what you get: "a sea of data breaches, with many calling for more transparency and regulations." Not feeling the love here. What is really sad is that counting on your sales associates to have a personal focus in serving your customers and looking at how you're organizing your own POS are among the least-used strategies. In other words, since we're pathetic at actual human effort and relationships, let's turn to technology! If we're all going down this road, let's call it a "mass marketing strategy" and stop pretending that it's "personal."

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