PROFILE

Ian Percy

President, The Ian Percy Corporation

Ian Percy is a Possibilities Expert and the founder of The Infinite Possibilities Initiative, a process for applying principles from quantum and energetic science for exponentially higher levels of innovation and profitability. An organizational psychologist, he is one of the most acclaimed business and inspirational speakers in the world. Successful Meetings magazine declared him “One of the top 21 speakers for the 21st century” and he is one of only three speakers inducted into both the US and Canadian Speaker Halls of Fame. Ian’s remarkable ability to blend depth of insight with inspiration is sought after by a wide variety of corporations and associations.

Recently he’s developed a process that engages entire cities in ‘possibility thinking’ and in understanding that they control the collective ‘energy’ that attracts or repels new residents, investments and businesses. Many organizations are stuck in 16th century Newtonian thinking, he insists, and that makes them almost irrelevant to a 21st century marketplace. For starters, he says, we need to move far beyond ‘problem solving’ to ‘seeing possibilities’. When leaders focus on the latter, problems resolve themselves and a new and prosperous reality begins to emerge. That is the secret to building a culture of innovation!

In addition Ian is a co-founder of Verdant Technologies LLC, a company that brings advanced technologies to many sectors like sustainable energy, waste management, agriculture, water science, medical devices, electric vehicles. etc.

He has authored seven highly respected books including the breakthrough book on leadership titled: Going Deep and The Profitable Power of Purpose which challenges traditional thinking about corporate vision. His latest ebook is Make Your Life a Masterpiece, a modern English translation of James Allen’s 1902 classic As a Man Thinketh.

Ian has both Canadian and US citizenships and lives in Scottsdale, Arizona.

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  • Posted on: 07/11/2018

    Is your culture your brand?

    The first branding expert may have been Moses. He wrote "Be sure your sin will find you out." Hear that Wells Fargo? Nissan? VW? Tobacco companies? Enron? Bernard Madoff? "Culture" is a word that captures who we are, what we believe and how we interact with the world. "Brand" is the evidence or declaration of that culture. Sometimes organizations aren't sure who they are so they try to create something. Other times organizations try to compensate with clever branding because they know they have sinned. I'm sorry, slogans, clever marketing copy and new golf shirts will not save your soul. I had a hospital client where some awful things had gone on. In an effort to "re-brand" the CEO stood at the door one morning and handed out "We Care!" buttons to staff coming on shift. Many of the depressed and discouraged staff literally said, "no we don't" and refused to take a button. Look, like painting over rust, sooner or later who we really are will be seen by the world around us. True personally, true corporately and true as a country. Culture becomes the brand as so many colleagues have insightfully said here. It does not work the other way around.
  • Posted on: 06/29/2018

    Is making burgers now a job for robots?

    Yes and no. There is beautiful computer-generated art. And there is the art that flows from the spirit, mind and hands of a gifted Artist. Are the creatives of our world thereby doomed? Of course not. One may be beautiful but the other goes beyond that to touch your heart. Who do you admire? The unnamed, unseen programmer in an unknown location...or the weathered artist with the messy studio and permanent paint stains absorbed into his or her gnarled fingers that still produce images of awe. Look - no one at a fast food outlet marvels at the creativity and uniqueness of their burger. "No pickles" is hardly worthy of proclamation. So yes, if you just want a decent burger, it will inevitably be produced robotically. On the other hand you've seen the Food Channel's programs about burger joints in places you've never heard of that make a truly unique product not found elsewhere. The artist lives behind the grill creating a meal for you worthy of a field trip. May it be forever so.
  • Posted on: 06/27/2018

    Survey finds marketers struggle to deliver personalized content

    Am I alone in thinking that just maybe marketers are trying too hard? We've hit a point where we need a dictionary just to understand marketing jargon; a sure predictor of eventual demise. My goodness, how does using "automation" and "personalization" in the same sentence make any real human sense? Complicating a process is also often just a way to escape brutal truth ... we've got to get back to human basics of heart-to-heart communication. Not everyone wants our stuff no matter how we try to personalize it. If we can't do well by putting out a genuine, appealing, persuasive story perhaps we've got the wrong stuff.
  • Posted on: 06/25/2018

    Past browsing does not indicate future purchase

    This is THE most sensible article on the whole "personalization" issue I've read. Thanks Doug! I'm glad to see that my thoughts are redundant to most of my colleagues. The Hebrew prophet Jeremiah wrote that the human heart will trick you every time, no one can know it. Algorithms or not, that still stands true. "Browsing" is an online synonym for curiosity. This morning over coffee I browsed for a KIA Stinger out of nothing but curiosity because a friend mentioned it at dinner last night. Now I'm braced for the "personalized" deluge!
  • Posted on: 06/19/2018

    Will an online dating site formula work for pop-ups?

    You and I may stand alone in our thinking today, Ray. You've put it well. I have no quarrel with a pop-up as long as we all recognize that's what it is. It's like going to a flea market where you might find something amazing and that was lucky. You don't count on that happening next Saturday.
  • Posted on: 06/19/2018

    Will an online dating site formula work for pop-ups?

    Most of my colleagues love this idea. But I'm not sure about the viability of this model though I wish all innovators well. My first thought was "Is this a seller's or buyer's market?" Who is the most needy -- landlord or retailer? There is SO much retail space available it's hard to argue against it being a retail renter's market. To stay with the unfortunate Match metaphor, this is kind of like having a category called "Lonely People" with landlords pleading for a renter, any renter. I've never used Match but I don't think people write reports about what their date was really like -- or do they? "He drank the entire bottle himself" would not likely lead to new connections. The biggest challenge lies in the terms "temporary" and "short-term." I hate when Costco puts out something that we loved only to have it disappear because that was "temporary." Match brags about creating enduring relationships and marriages. I don't think the phrase "short-term" is used very often. There needs to be some evidence of seriousness and commitment if you're trying to build a relationship. A food truck used to test out a new grilled cheese sandwich may seem temporary because it can move around, but it's a major commitment not made lightly. If people line up it will be there tomorrow.
  • Posted on: 06/13/2018

    The question for today’s retailers: What business are you in?

    I really appreciate your comment, Zel ... my contribution above is totally aligned with yours though you've said it better. You're moving your organization from "what" to "why" Makes all the difference in the world. And if everyone gets it on a visceral level you'll be unassailable.
  • Posted on: 06/13/2018

    The question for today’s retailers: What business are you in?

    "What business are you in?" leads to a static answer though it is a good start. To make it dynamic you need to ask yourself "Why?" two more times. Most businesses are two "Whys" short of a compelling and meaningful purpose. Activity and busyness are typically defined economically (the "oikos nomos" or numbers). True purpose has to be defined ecologically (the "oikos logos" or word or meaning of your existence). Why does your retail operation exist? Who would miss it if it disappeared? Most of this article leans toward the economics of products, pricing, strategy, etc. We need both since what drives us and gives us meaning is the ecological and what rewards us is the economic. Going for the numbers without the meaning will wear you out and make you miserable. Not being able to sustain your higher calling because you're broke isn't so wonderful either. I respectfully suggest a better question is "What good are you doing that will make our world a better place?" Do you create or preserve beauty? Are you adding to human knowledge? Are you bringing joy and laughter to a sad world? Do you offer clothing that helps people express their uniqueness and build their self-confidence? Do you help keep our beloved pets healthier so they live longer? Are you helping to restore nature to what it used to be? Are you helping parents feed their kids properly? You know when you've found your life's calling when the customers are as excited about your purpose and vision as you are.
  • Posted on: 06/08/2018

    Retailers told to forget social media

    As always, well said Ryan. We all wish there was "A" magic wand out there!
  • Posted on: 06/08/2018

    Retailers told to forget social media

    Yesterday many of us contributed comments on the invasive "noise" retailers are forcing customers to endure or run from. Social media content for the most part is more of the same. I have managed to stem the flow of this noise down to relatively few sources. Most of those would be gone too if I were a little braver in unsubscribing or blocking. There are three social media postings that are actual destinations for me every week. I'd miss them if they went away. Three. Ask yourself how long it's been since you read content that made you think, that was something you hadn't heard before or that was something you wanted to learn more about. Mr. Salvatori referred to "organic content." What the heck is that? Thank goodness he declared it almost worthless. The definition of organic is "something derived from living matter." That includes fertilizer (to be polite). Now, if it meant truly "original" thoughts and ideas coming from a creative and insatiably curious human being, I'd sign up in a heartbeat.
  • Posted on: 06/07/2018

    Retailers get real with high-touch service

    Originally one of my books was to be titled "The Most Difficult Question in the Universe." I asked grade school kids what they thought that question was. My favorite was "Who are you and what do you want?" Seems to be we're consumed by all the media tools, we assume that what made someone else successful will make us successful and we've forgotten how to be real, to have relevant and honest conversations with our customers, to communicate heart to heart and mind to mind. My colleagues are right -- as a lot we're generating noise for the most part. A return to integrity seems to be an obvious first step ... followed by choosing the best medium to communicate that integrity. Marshall McLuhan is still right, the medium is the message.
  • Posted on: 06/04/2018

    Retailers can make personalization work

    Could not be said any better, Doug! I'm proud just to have my contribution next to yours. It's like we're abandoning the unlimited potential of our humanness to create the future, relegating that responsibility to semiconductors. That strategy is futile, IMO. Your blog post is well worth looking at as well. Thanks.
  • Posted on: 06/04/2018

    Retailers can make personalization work

    Technology is usually seen as solving a problem. That means by definition it is always focused on the past, on mending yesterday. That's why so many of us are inundated with ads to buy what we've already bought. Telling me what I will want tomorrow is still a challenge unmet. We don't know ourselves what we will want tomorrow -- so we turn to algorithms? The best shot retail has at being sustainably relevant is to think, imagine, intuit, experiment, dream. Look beyond your usual sources to what else is going on around the world. Take footwear (since there was a picture of it in this piece). I remember going to the Bata Shoe Museum in Toronto 20 years ago and seeing sneakers from other countries that look similar to what we're just now seeing in the U.S. Possibilities are metaphysical entities; forms of energy. Everything that ever was and ever will be exists in that way. They are all vibrating around you at this moment though many may think that to be nonsense. We humans have been gifted with the ability to "see" and realize those possibilities. Sadly very few of us use it. There is no "spirit" in technology which is why it will not save us.
  • Posted on: 05/31/2018

    New Whole Foods’ store-within-a-store concept is ‘rooted in nature’


    You shatter my dreams Ken Lonyai!
  • Posted on: 05/31/2018

    New Whole Foods’ store-within-a-store concept is ‘rooted in nature’


    I have to admit it was the "rooted in nature" meme that made me want to respond to this article. It's an interesting piece, but not what I was expecting. "Rooted in nature" does not bring up images of aprons, jewelry and pottery though I'm rethinking what "nature" means. Still, my comment is a long way from slotting allowances and centralized buying. I apologize. Probably because I'm deeply involved in a venture focused on advanced biologics, plant-based nutrients and pesticides, soil remediation and medical foods I had a brief moment of excitement that Whole Foods was thinking along the same lines. I absolutely believe nature has the solution to every problem humankind has created. That means from diseases to water contamination to chemical pollution of our food. I'm desperately hoping our world is on the edge of transition back to the "nature" we once had that truly made us whole. The big question is whether or not the industrial, medical and governmental establishment will continue to block the path.

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