PROFILE

Ian Percy

President, The Ian Percy Corporation

Ian Percy is a Possibilities Expert and the founder of The Infinite Possibilities Initiative, a process for applying principles from quantum and energetic science for exponentially higher levels of innovation and profitability. An organizational psychologist, he is one of the most acclaimed business and inspirational speakers in the world. Successful Meetings magazine declared him “One of the top 21 speakers for the 21st century” and he is one of only three speakers inducted into both the US and Canadian Speaker Halls of Fame. Ian’s remarkable ability to blend depth of insight with inspiration is sought after by a wide variety of corporations and associations.

Recently he’s developed a process that engages entire cities in ‘possibility thinking’ and in understanding that they control the collective ‘energy’ that attracts or repels new residents, investments and businesses. Many organizations are stuck in 16th century Newtonian thinking, he insists, and that makes them almost irrelevant to a 21st century marketplace. For starters, he says, we need to move far beyond ‘problem solving’ to ‘seeing possibilities’. When leaders focus on the latter, problems resolve themselves and a new and prosperous reality begins to emerge. That is the secret to building a culture of innovation!

In addition Ian is a co-founder of Verdant Technologies LLC, a company that brings advanced technologies to many sectors like sustainable energy, waste management, agriculture, water science, medical devices, electric vehicles. etc.

He has authored seven highly respected books including the breakthrough book on leadership titled: Going Deep and The Profitable Power of Purpose which challenges traditional thinking about corporate vision. His latest ebook is Make Your Life a Masterpiece, a modern English translation of James Allen’s 1902 classic As a Man Thinketh.

Ian has both Canadian and US citizenships and lives in Scottsdale, Arizona.

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  • Posted on: 11/06/2018

    Facebook delivers digital brands to the Market @ Macy’s for Christmas

    "...customers crave uniqueness." is THE secret of a good marketing strategy and even more so when one is trying to influence buying behaviour in a foreign country. (See what I did with the spelling there?) I'm referring to the other RetailWire item today about L.L.Bean expanding into Canada. Insightful as always Chris!
  • Posted on: 11/06/2018

    Will L.L.Bean find success in Canada where others have failed?

    I'm not sure even the buffering that the Canadian Jaytex Group will provide to L.L.Bean will do it. Few U.S. companies will ever truly get it; get the uniqueness of "Canadian." Weaving "L.L.Bean" into a tuque is mere condescension. I have both citizenships and have been very happy living in Arizona for 20 years. But I've never understood the American mindset that this country is the best in the world at absolutely everything. There are many pluses, but that simply isn't true, not by a longshot. The disconnect with so many expansions into the Canadian market culture is the very notion of "expansion" as though the entire continent is one experience. The magic key, I think, is for U.S. companies to do something different in Canada that isn't done in the U.S. Yes, the Walmarts and Costcos seem to have pulled it off. I swear Costco is successful in Canada because they serve poutine!
  • Posted on: 10/29/2018

    What if artificial intelligence is biased?

    As usual, a further thought came to me after I submitted my comment. I referenced the work of the great masters. We heard that an AI-generated portrait just sold for $432,500. So should it be listed along with the Mona Lisa or The Man With The Golden Helmet? Or can you get another copy by hitting "enter?" What really is the difference? Understanding that may help us rethink retail.
  • Posted on: 10/29/2018

    What if artificial intelligence is biased?

    You've provoked my thinking, Charles. Even "bias detecting" AI software will be biased and will perpetuate a never ending spiral of "bias-ness." We've learned this from software production generally. Software fixes account for almost half of all software faults. Will there ever be fault-free software? Or unbiased AI? I'm working on the former but am not quite so sure of the latter. Appreciated your contribution.
  • Posted on: 10/29/2018

    What if artificial intelligence is biased?

    EVERYTHING not of nature, that is, built or manifested by human kind, came from imagination and thought. Those of us with a creationist bent believe even our natural world came to us that way. Algorithms themselves came into existence through the same magical influences that created the paintings of the great masters. Their "biases," the way they see and experience the world, is what makes those works treasured for all time. So what is the difference between the creation of AI technology and these masterpieces? The answer lies in the "Why?" da Vinci, Rembrandt and others, I believe, were channels of what they produced. To get more into the science side, this was true of Fleming and Tesla too. They did their work because their destiny called them to do it. And that is what we're rapidly losing today. Everything that will ever be possible already exists on a non-material plane. Our work, as creative instruments of the future, is to pick up on which possibilities have our name on them. When we find them, our job is to make them real. Sadly, we are rapidly moving from a "must" motivation, a response to a higher calling if you will, to a "can" motivation. Yes, many "can" develop AI algorithms and it is those that raise the concerns in this article. Those who use their brilliance to do so because they must, I am confident, will do so for the greater good.
  • Posted on: 10/25/2018

    Will organic food sales soar on the latest cancer research?

    Always look forward to your contributions, Ken, but I don't see what is "misleading." You said what I said though perhaps more eloquently.
  • Posted on: 10/25/2018

    Will organic food sales soar on the latest cancer research?

    Love your last sentence, Ryan. Brilliant.
  • Posted on: 10/25/2018

    Will organic food sales soar on the latest cancer research?

    As admitted to in this piece the jury is sill out re the advantages of what is called "organic" foods. The term "organic" unfortunately has primarily become a marketing term rather than a true measure of food quality. If one were to blockchain the food back to where the seed came from, what soil it was planted in, what water was used, etc. there'd be big shock and disappointment. As in computing, garbage in, garbage out. There is a movement in plant-based medicinals, however, for a growing number of serious afflictions including cancers. Some results quite miraculous. But again, the entire development chain of those products must be pristine and secure.
  • Posted on: 10/16/2018

    Does anyone pay the full retail price anymore?

    I think the whole concept of "full price" is a myth. The smoke and mirrors of retail. What exactly does the word "full" mean? Full of what? I suggest full of wishful thinking. Price is something someone makes up even if they make up a formula for how to calculate it. It isn't a pre-defined or bound by reality thing. We know exactly what a certain rock weighs in what the world defines as pounds or kilograms. But "price?" It's the highest amount a manufacturer or retailer thinks will still move product on any given day. As Neil points out, this applies to both luxury and low price brands.
  • Posted on: 10/11/2018

    Is disruption coming to the alcohol beverage business?

    On the mark, Stephen. See my note re: the Canadian system. Could be the poster child for the point you've made.
  • Posted on: 10/11/2018

    Is disruption coming to the alcohol beverage business?

    Nothing is worse than the system in Ontario specifically, if not Canada generally. There you have a one-tier system called the government. Wine we'd pay $6.95 for at Trader Joe's in Scottsdale will be over $20 in Toronto. A cash cow for the government if there ever was one. Part of me says, heck, leave well enough alone!
  • Posted on: 10/10/2018

    Will Best Buy’s golden years strategy deliver long-term success?

    Based on the brief explanation of Best Buy's intention with the "elderly," I am disappointed by the implication that those over 65 are in need only of emergency call buttons and helpful ways to "keep their independence." Sure some older folks need help to sustain themselves, but "Best Buy" doesn't come first to mind for them. This is NOT your parents' elderly population. Come on retail, wake up and move into the 21st century! People well over 65 are starting businesses, running marathons, writing music and books, inventing amazing things. Right now I'm in the process of acquiring remarkable technology from some brilliant guys averaging well over 80 years. The oldest still cycles every day on a $7,000 bike. They are not sitting drooling in the sunroom waiting for Tuesday night Bingo. Creating technology that is intuitive and simple to use with applications that people actually use and not just included because some programmer can, will benefit everyone. Twenty-somethings get just as frustrated with technology as seventy- and eighty-somethings. And who wouldn't rather talk to a person than spend an hour clicking their way to no resolution? If Best Buy or retail generally gets caught up in condescension toward this market sector this "innovation" won't last long.
  • Posted on: 10/05/2018

    There may be benefits to adding uncertainty to rewards programs

    Evan, you've hit on a point that is not likely to be raised very often in this discussion. That is: What behavior do you want to see? Too often retailers have a non-defined expectation like "to buy more stuff from our store." Clearly we need deeper thinking than that. Appreciate your excellent contribution.
  • Posted on: 10/05/2018

    There may be benefits to adding uncertainty to rewards programs

    Nothing new here at all. I did my graduate work and research in psychology back in the late seventies storing data on punch cards that I very quickly learned to number. Younger colleagues on the BrainTrust may well wonder "What's he talking about?" Even back then as we honed our research skills by training white rats, we learned that intermittent and non-predictable rewards significantly increased the desired behavior. And this outcome was known decades before that. When "rewards" are consistent and regulated they quickly become expectations and entitlement. The idea of "motivation" ceases to be part of the formula. As someone one said: "If you want a new idea, look in an old book." It appears the U of C did exactly that.
  • Posted on: 09/26/2018

    Does business need more and better storytellers?

    Here's how I see it -- If storytelling was good enough for Jesus it's good enough for me! But it's not a matter of "underestimating" the value of a good, engaging, emotion-grabbing story. The problem is many business leaders are literally afraid of a good, engaging, emotion-grabbing story. Emotion scares them. And they have no clue as to how to tell one. Get rid of all the "fluff" one advisor told be in a review of a business plan I'd written. Supposedly if everything was in bullet points (using an instrument of destruction is an interesting way to communicate, isn't it?) and spreadsheets, I'm sure he'd claim to be happy with it. Fear. It's all about fear. When you're afraid you resort to bullets. Now, admittedly, my business plans tend to start with "It was a dark and stormy night..." I asked him if the 20 page brochure describing the Maserati he just bought was filled with bullet points and detailed spreadsheets. Or was it filled with blurry pictures of the car screaming up a winding mountain road, close-ups of the hand stitching in the upholstery, the crowd in front of the opera house looking in awe as the car drove by. Of course with such prompts the customer is mentally telling her or himself the story of what it's like to own such a work of mechanical art. I think every retail leader should take a creative writing class. And then, once they learn to write an engaging story, take a course on how to present that story in an even more engaging way.

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