PROFILE

Ian Percy

President, The Ian Percy Corporation

Ian Percy is a Possibilities Expert and the founder of The Infinite Possibilities Initiative, a process for applying principles from quantum and energetic science for exponentially higher levels of innovation and profitability. An organizational psychologist, he is one of the most acclaimed business and inspirational speakers in the world. Successful Meetings magazine declared him “One of the top 21 speakers for the 21st century” and he is one of only three speakers inducted into both the US and Canadian Speaker Halls of Fame. Ian’s remarkable ability to blend depth of insight with inspiration is sought after by a wide variety of corporations and associations.

Recently he’s developed a process that engages entire cities in ‘possibility thinking’ and in understanding that they control the collective ‘energy’ that attracts or repels new residents, investments and businesses. Many organizations are stuck in 16th century Newtonian thinking, he insists, and that makes them almost irrelevant to a 21st century marketplace. For starters, he says, we need to move far beyond ‘problem solving’ to ‘seeing possibilities’. When leaders focus on the latter, problems resolve themselves and a new and prosperous reality begins to emerge. That is the secret to building a culture of innovation!

In addition Ian is a co-founder of Verdant Technologies LLC, a company that brings advanced technologies to many sectors like sustainable energy, waste management, agriculture, water science, medical devices, electric vehicles. etc.

He has authored seven highly respected books including the breakthrough book on leadership titled: Going Deep and The Profitable Power of Purpose which challenges traditional thinking about corporate vision. His latest ebook is Make Your Life a Masterpiece, a modern English translation of James Allen’s 1902 classic As a Man Thinketh.

Ian has both Canadian and US citizenships and lives in Scottsdale, Arizona.

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  • Posted on: 07/22/2019

    Should retailers hire more ex-cons?

    Your vital point is easily missed here Bob. If these folks are selfishly and immorally "used" for PR by retailers it simply repeats what got these folks into trouble in the first place. There's a big difference between being "used" and being legitimately "useful" in a new and rewarding occupation.
  • Posted on: 07/22/2019

    Should retailers hire more ex-cons?

    I fully support this movement, as defined above, for spiritual, moral and economic reasons. Let's face it, there but for the grace of God go many of us. As I understand the story, the resurrection of the Indian Motorcycle Company was largely due to the fact they hired ex-cons to build them. Makes all the sense in the world when you think about it. The U.S. leads the world in only three categories and the number of incarcerated citizens per capita is one of them. The largest prison population in the world. Why that is so is a major dimension in political discussions these days.
  • Posted on: 07/18/2019

    What’s the recipe for de-stressing entrepreneurs?

    Important insight here, Susan, thank you. Our colleague Mohamed Amer and I recently exchanged emails about the pros and cons of having a team of geniuses. That initially sounds so appealing because our expectation is they will quickly solve all our problems in the most effective way possible. But you are right -- it doesn't always turn out to be so rewarding. I learned that in working with boards filled with enormously successful and brilliant people. In too many of them (and at least in my experience) "the whole was less than the sum of the parts." Some strange dynamic happens resulting in incredible waste of time, poor or non-existent decision-making, constant tension and pretty well zero courageous thinking and risk-taking. Now if we could just figure out how to make it all work....
  • Posted on: 07/18/2019

    What’s the recipe for de-stressing entrepreneurs?

    My chronic entrepreneurism syndrome (CES) was first diagnosed in 1971, so long ago. In spite of all the stress and pressures described by my sisters and brothers here today, it is simply part of who I am and what I do. It will be thus til the end of time. I found myself strangely calmed and comforted just reading the responses today. This is my tribe and I am so very grateful for you all. And hey, let's launch another startup ... the "EAA." Not to cure CES, but to enhance and celebrate it, and make it even more fun. You in?
  • Posted on: 07/18/2019

    Will Gap’s new loyalty program bring meaningful rewards?

    Oh how we long to solve the mystery of loyalty! To love and be loved. But alas, when there's money involved it cannot be. Even in marriage vows of loyalty there's been a longstanding effort to take money out of the equation with the phrase "for richer or poorer." We know how well that's worked out. In retail reality the loyalty vow includes "'til a better sale doth us part."
  • Posted on: 07/12/2019

    Franchisees want McD’s to be more like Chick-fil-A

    Insightful, my friend. Another way to put your "politics" observation is that it's the STORY. McDonald's has lost the power of the story. As I mentioned in my piece today, in Raising Cane's Chicken Fingers locations you simply cannot miss the story. It's on the walls and other signage and any staff member will tell it to you if you show interest.
  • Posted on: 07/12/2019

    Franchisees want McD’s to be more like Chick-fil-A

    You are right about Chick-fil-A employees, Georganne. We don't go there often but the first time we asked for recommendations since we were new to the menu, you'd think we were long-lost relatives suddenly returning home. As first-timers, our lunch was free and at least three times we were asked if everything was okay and could they get us anything else. I find the same attitude at Raising Cane's Chicken Fingers that I praised in my post today.
  • Posted on: 07/12/2019

    Franchisees want McD’s to be more like Chick-fil-A

    Since we're talking about chicken... Raising Cane's Chicken Fingers is light years ahead of both Chick-fil-A and McDonald's. In addition to the quality of its chicken, Raising Cane's has created its own lane by focusing in on a single food item - chicken fingers. And yes you can have them in a bun, but it's chicken fingers. Oh, and the best lemonade on the planet. I'm told that founder Todd Graves described this single item strategy in a paper he wrote in business school only to receive a failing grade from a professor who said it would never work. I believe the company owns most if not all of its locations. "Cane" was the name of Graves' dog. What I know is that Cane's is the only fast food place my wife and I have made a destination.
  • Posted on: 07/01/2019

    Can mobile sensing tools boost worker productivity?

    Your story about the 10,000 steps reminds me of the stories behind the Myers Briggs "type indicator" test or the origins of the familiar eye chart for visual acuity - neither of which had much, if any, validation and yet have been adopted with little thought about their integrity. We are duped from all directions it seems!
  • Posted on: 07/01/2019

    Can mobile sensing tools boost worker productivity?

    And so we continue the tragic slide to dehumanization. Interesting that this "research" was supported by the Director of National Intelligence. Hasn't it dawned on these people that there is no "national intelligence?" You can make people perform, that's how the pyramids were built. But if what you are looking for is commitment, engagement, innovation, perseverance, etc. from your employees, that's a matter of free will and comes from one's heart and spirit. No tracking mechanism can measure that. Those qualities can only be given by an employee to an employer, they cannot be taken or demanded. I'm still shaking my head at this news.
  • Posted on: 06/26/2019

    Three experiential retailers doing store design right

    I'm the self-declared President of the Phibbs fan club, but I think something is missing in this discussion. There's a big difference between "experiential" and "design." Experience is omnipresent like air. One cannot not have an experience. "Design" has a wide etymological history but basically it gets down to "de" (out) and "sign" (to mark). Personally, I think "Design Rules!" But it needs a strategic, mission-critical purpose. So here's the problem. Too many times the link between design and experience is accidental and haphazard. Design can make or ruin you. We seem to think that the purpose of design in retail is to cause customers to linger as in "they get to watch coffee being made." Frankly, that's the sign of an empty life! Lingering is not the best economic strategy IMHO. This is why Starbucks is still the best office rental deal you can get -- for $4 you get to stay all day with free internet. Starbucks profits come from those who do NOT linger. The area I know best is the design of senior facilities; the principles are the same. There is a LOT of research on the physical and emotional impact of design on seniors though most of it is ignored by operators. For example, for two hundred bucks you can put a really nicely designed frame around the door to someone's place. Makes all the difference in the world. This welcoming "sign" can make one glad to be walking into their "home" instead of a "room." Design can help people literally live longer, be happier and healthier, form relationships, etc. But it has to be based on proven purpose. In retail, Purposeful Design must lead to a Purchase Experience.
  • Posted on: 06/25/2019

    Are airports now the sweet spot for luxury retail?

    Assuming the facts noted here are indeed correct ... I still don't get it. Airports, to me, are places of stress, turmoil, broken dreams (of on-time departures), general duress and people sneezing. And Ricardo is right in his comment that an airport, almost by definition, must be under construction. Once you get in the plane, it gets worse. Of course, I'm old enough to remember when they'd cut chateaubriand in the aisle and serve it on an actual plate. If one is hungry, sure, find a sit-down restaurant where you can have lunch for under $20. But to walk around because your flight is delayed and spend your money on luxury goods? I don't get it. If it's clothing, where are you going to put it? How do you return it if you need to? Perfume? Half the price at Walmart. I suppose there are people who can't go a couple of hours without buying something, I just hope they're not related to me. Having spent most of my long career flying somewhere almost every week, I don't do that anymore. Can you tell? ...I don't miss it a bit!
  • Posted on: 06/18/2019

    Are Shark Tank-like competitions a path to retail innovation?

    Well, "We the North" Canadians are a humble people. Though ... did I mention that Toronto is THE greatest NBA championship City since Naismith, a Canadian, invented basketball and since 1946 when the very first NBA game ever was played in Toronto?
  • Posted on: 06/18/2019

    Are Shark Tank-like competitions a path to retail innovation?

    Excellent. You have provided an insightful "reality check" to this concept Mohamed. As I wrote, though not as well nor as succinctly as you, innovation does not come from replication.
  • Posted on: 06/18/2019

    Are Shark Tank-like competitions a path to retail innovation?

    There's a multitude of websites claiming to expose the reality of the Shark Tank experience. As with pretty well all "reality " shows, there's not that much reality. What is well worth consideration, however, is how to tap into the noumenon, Kant's ethereal world where all possibilities exist. "Me too" approaches, where we but mimic what has already been done to find innovation, seem somewhat oxymoronic. Innovation generates innovation, not replication. There have been several versions of the Shark Tank model and, in truth, Shark Tank itself is a copy of the original idea. All that said, is it still worth a try? For the PR maybe.

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