PROFILE

Ian Percy

President, The Ian Percy Corporation

Ian Percy is a Possibilities Expert and the founder of The Infinite Possibilities Initiative, a process for applying principles from quantum and energetic science for exponentially higher levels of innovation and profitability. An organizational psychologist, he is one of the most acclaimed business and inspirational speakers in the world. Successful Meetings magazine declared him “One of the top 21 speakers for the 21st century” and he is one of only three speakers inducted into both the US and Canadian Speaker Halls of Fame. Ian’s remarkable ability to blend depth of insight with inspiration is sought after by a wide variety of corporations and associations.

Recently he’s developed a process that engages entire cities in ‘possibility thinking’ and in understanding that they control the collective ‘energy’ that attracts or repels new residents, investments and businesses. Many organizations are stuck in 16th century Newtonian thinking, he insists, and that makes them almost irrelevant to a 21st century marketplace. For starters, he says, we need to move far beyond ‘problem solving’ to ‘seeing possibilities’. When leaders focus on the latter, problems resolve themselves and a new and prosperous reality begins to emerge. That is the secret to building a culture of innovation!

In addition Ian is a co-founder of Verdant Technologies LLC, a company that brings advanced technologies to many sectors like sustainable energy, waste management, agriculture, water science, medical devices, electric vehicles. etc.

He has authored seven highly respected books including the breakthrough book on leadership titled: Going Deep and The Profitable Power of Purpose which challenges traditional thinking about corporate vision. His latest ebook is Make Your Life a Masterpiece, a modern English translation of James Allen’s 1902 classic As a Man Thinketh.

Ian has both Canadian and US citizenships and lives in Scottsdale, Arizona.

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  • Posted on: 06/14/2021

    UPS entry could even the same-day delivery playing field

    Exactly! This is why it becomes a fatally self-inflicted wound. I may be pushing metaphors too far but it's like a spoiled child, someone who's always been giving everything — there is no end to the expectations aka entitlements. Not good for the child or the parent. In this case, first it was free delivery, then 3-days, then same day and now we're down to hours. Not good for the retailer and, surprisingly if we think about it, not good for the customer either.
  • Posted on: 06/14/2021

    UPS entry could even the same-day delivery playing field

    Totally agree with you Bob. Actually, I think all holes retail digs for itself should be at the same depth. That way the race to the bottom becomes more fair. Forget the level playing field. This morning while out with the dog at 5 AM in 80 degree AZ heat, I wondered who set up the focus group that asked customers if they'd like delivery of a product within hours. As you imply, Bob, the devil is in the data.
  • Posted on: 05/14/2021

    Hubert Joly says ‘human connection’ laid the foundation of Best Buy’s turnaround

    There are always good and bad customer experiences in EVERY retail organization no matter how lauded and iconic they may be. That's part of the human experience. What's also part of the human experience is the need "to love and be loved" as we learned in Psych 101. Absolutely nothing will replace human connection. Mr. Joly knew that and applied it to great effect — and profitability. This is such a fundamental reality. What bothers me is that so much of the retail sector is preferring a "touch-less" ("soul-less?") strategy, using their artificial intelligence to find ways to avoid human connection. Pychologically and materially this is the path to unhappiness, meaningless work and perhaps demise.
  • Posted on: 05/05/2021

    Are retailers making it too tough for seniors to shop online?

    You are SO right! Adding some points: The New York Times notes that Boomers are "the greatest source of entrepreneurism." 60 percent of the United Inventors Association members are over 50. The majority of patents are issued to us. And Forbes estimated that 96 percent of Boomers are media and tech savvy. We rule!
  • Posted on: 05/05/2021

    Are retailers making it too tough for seniors to shop online?

    Ditto, Ryan! Cannot be said better. If the customer doesn't understand something, blame the customer. It's a winning strategy! Unfortunatley most user interface is created by 20 or 30 somethings who do not take into account that we all lose a considerable percentage of our perceptual bandwidth as we age. And yes you can join AARP at 50 but that is more a marketing strategy not a true sensitivity to "aging" or "retirement," not these days. Interestingly only 10 percent of media spend is aimed at the Boomer and older demographic. Yet, according to the Federal Reserve, those over 55 years control 72.6 percent of household wealth. Those over 70 control 27.8 percent. IMHO this category is an untapped treasure-trove of talent, ideas, energy and ambition -- and wealth. And I don't just say that because I am one! Still working on the wealth bit. :)
  • Posted on: 04/22/2021

    Are associates better than influencers for shopping livestreams?

    Generally agree with you, Jeff. For example, in the video about the plants, it wouldn't take much to zoom in on the plant being described. Still there is considerable appeal in "authentic amateurism." Too much professionalism can make it look slick, scripted, artificial and soul-less.
  • Posted on: 04/22/2021

    Are associates better than influencers for shopping livestreams?

    First, did everyone notice that Dave is doing re this article what he's recommending for retailers? Engaging with the audience. Makes me wonder what other ideas he has for retail. Isn't that the whole point? Second, this is one of the most thoughtful insights I've seen in a long time. Technology is not the answer to customer relationships, authentic people are. Dave is right, the influence of influencers is rapidly waning. Somewhere in most organizations is someone with the necessary presence, energy, charisma to be the livestream associate face of the shop. The first place I'd look is at employees who don't fit the stereotype, that have something different about them. Who might be regarded as a "character." The retail version of the "It" factor. Also keep in mind that this doesn't have to be a "straight to camera" performance. Few truly have that as a natural gift. Various forms of interview can also help. For example, what if a manager interviews a floor associate about specific products in a way that demonstrates the associate's knowledge, skill, thinking, etc.? It would be great if that could also demonstrate how manager is impressed with and proud of the associate. Great piece, Dave Bruno.
  • Posted on: 04/21/2021

    Is Athleta’s Canadian expansion a stretch for the Gap-owned chain?

    Thank you Gene! I was annoyed by the condescending remarks from our colleagues above. That attitude is why companies like Target failed miserably in Canada. First, the population is actually 38,005,113. My only suggestion is that Athleta hire Canadians in senior executives roles and especially for marketing.
  • Posted on: 04/09/2021

    Will Google Maps bring a new dimension to the in-store experience?

    Okay -- I'll admit it. I am now officially too old to see the value in this technology. The whole world is becoming a soul-less vending machine! Sure it would be helpful in finding one's way around LAX or a general neighborhood. But to locate items in a store? I have another innovation to suggest — it's called SERVICE. Employees who actually help shoppers in other words. There are early adopters like ACE Hardware, Trader Joe's, etc. and it seems to work for them. Hopefully it will catch on.
  • Posted on: 04/08/2021

    Will Best Buy’s customers love its new service and savings plan?

    Any chance you could drop in at my place once I get the new stuff Richard? :)
  • Posted on: 04/08/2021

    Will Best Buy’s customers love its new service and savings plan?

    This initiative may have positive possibilities which will or will not become self-evident quickly. My first issue is that, based on my experience, I have almost zero confidence in the skills of the local Geek Squad. Frankly it's been a nightmare. Second, once one has the products needed and the system set up, it's hard to see why one would draw on the service repeatedly. Given I'm in the midst of a renovation, I might pay the $180 to get a new system set up because I hate doing that stuff. Then I'd take advantage of the "cancel at any time" clause.
  • Posted on: 03/31/2021

    Where will ‘disruptive innovation’ take the retail business?

    Well and briefly said, Patricia. That's exactly the point I tried to make in my submission today. Anytime someone has to tell me they have an "open mind" I know they don't. It takes a "shuddering" to move us to a new place, "dramatic circumstances" as you put it.
  • Posted on: 03/31/2021

    Where will ‘disruptive innovation’ take the retail business?

    I'll put a slight twist on the discussion. All true innovation is disruptive or it wouldn't be innovation. It's a matter of degree. Until there is a disruption in mindset, adapting to (or creating) the future will be a constant and stressful struggle. In most situations including retail, the human mind is the hardest thing to change. An eagerness to think differently comes first for both the innovator and the innovatee.
  • Posted on: 03/25/2021

    Are you feeling loyal?

    The only problem, Shep, is that by the time you wait to see if the customers come back in order to verify their loyalty, it is likely too late. A friend once observed that we could avoid most disasters in our lives if we'd made a different decision two weeks prior. That insight may well apply to retailers too.
  • Posted on: 03/25/2021

    Are you feeling loyal?

    First - an excellent article Peter, you speak for all of us ex-road warriors. Well here we go again desperately trying to keep this loyalty myth alive. These are TRANSACTIONS! That is not loyalty. We shop for the best deal we can get from credit cards, retailers, everything. Customers play the "loyalty" game much better than retailers. The question raised so well in this piece is: "Who is getting the best of the transaction?" Apparently it's not the retailer! This reminds me of what our colleague Bob Phibbs used to repeatedly warn retailers about Groupon with the admonition: "You can't afford it!"

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