PROFILE

Ian Percy

President, The Ian Percy Corporation

Ian Percy is a Possibilities Expert and the founder of The Infinite Possibilities Initiative, a process for applying principles from quantum and energetic science for exponentially higher levels of innovation and profitability. An organizational psychologist, he is one of the most acclaimed business and inspirational speakers in the world. Successful Meetings magazine declared him “One of the top 21 speakers for the 21st century” and he is one of only three speakers inducted into both the US and Canadian Speaker Halls of Fame. Ian’s remarkable ability to blend depth of insight with inspiration is sought after by a wide variety of corporations and associations.

Recently he’s developed a process that engages entire cities in ‘possibility thinking’ and in understanding that they control the collective ‘energy’ that attracts or repels new residents, investments and businesses. Many organizations are stuck in 16th century Newtonian thinking, he insists, and that makes them almost irrelevant to a 21st century marketplace. For starters, he says, we need to move far beyond ‘problem solving’ to ‘seeing possibilities’. When leaders focus on the latter, problems resolve themselves and a new and prosperous reality begins to emerge. That is the secret to building a culture of innovation!

In addition Ian is a co-founder of Verdant Technologies LLC, a company that brings advanced technologies to many sectors like sustainable energy, waste management, agriculture, water science, medical devices, electric vehicles. etc.

He has authored seven highly respected books including the breakthrough book on leadership titled: Going Deep and The Profitable Power of Purpose which challenges traditional thinking about corporate vision. His latest ebook is Make Your Life a Masterpiece, a modern English translation of James Allen’s 1902 classic As a Man Thinketh.

Ian has both Canadian and US citizenships and lives in Scottsdale, Arizona.

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  • Posted on: 11/06/2019

    Food halls drive mall traffic, not clothing sales

    Your last paragraph reflects my thinking exactly, Lisa - or maybe I'm reflecting yours in my contribution today! I differ only in that I think it's a long-term solution.
  • Posted on: 11/06/2019

    Food halls drive mall traffic, not clothing sales

    Is the whole greater than the sum of the parts? This old adage is attributed to many ranging from Aristotle to Helen Keller. But how does it apply to "the mall?" Seems to me that malls are collections of independent, non-related, non-aligned entities where the only commonality is they want your money. "Every store for itself" doesn't sound like much of a winning formula to me. This is the same problem most organizations have. They are a collection of "departments" each putting itself first and turning a blind eye to another department's struggles. But nothing in the universe actually works that way. Years ago I was able to get a client to have an annual session where every department had to endorse the goals and strategies of the other departments including any contribution they were able and willing to make to each other's success. Not only that, they had to do the same thing when it came to allocating budgets. The "greater good" was their driving force. Might a mall be designed and operated in the same way somehow? For example, how might a restaurant drive customers to a clothing store or vice versa?
  • Posted on: 11/05/2019

    Is Amazon starting to fall out of favor with American consumers?

    A truism for sure Paula: "No market is infinite." It's hard to admit and respond to that truth when we're rolling in success.
  • Posted on: 11/05/2019

    Is Amazon starting to fall out of favor with American consumers?

    While I wouldn't schedule the Amazon wake just yet, the unavoidable truth is that nothing in this universe escapes the "S" Curve lifecycle. There's birth, growth, maturity and demise. The only way to escape the inevitable is a major transformation or reinvention. The butterfly effect. Unfortunately, the decision to do so typically comes too late. When things are going well very few executives will urge people: "Let's think outside the box!" Typically that siren call means you should start looking around. Amazon is THE iconic example of retail transformation. At some point perhaps it will need to do it again. But can it? The more impactful and miraculous one's metamorphosis, the less likely another is possible. Most world-changing inventors are known for one thing - the da Vincis and Teslas of the world being the exception.
  • Posted on: 11/01/2019

    Survey says consumers want online orders shipped fast and free

    Just a thought... In some situations doing the opposite of what everyone else does pays off big time. What if someone flaunted the idea that reasonably-timed delivery (a week perhaps) is actually more economical, just as convenient and goods will arrive more carefully packaged rather than thrown in a box five times bigger than needed? For example, when I see a sign for a "Quick Shoe Shine" and see they use an electric polisher, I won't stop. If I saw "Shines done totally by hand, 10 minutes for a quality shine" I'd stop if I was wearing sneakers. Likewise, do I want dinner served to me 60 seconds after I order it? Whisky or wine bottled yesterday? "Fast and free" is a totally overrated gimmick!
  • Posted on: 11/01/2019

    Survey says consumers want online orders shipped fast and free

    You said it exactly right before I could, Chris. Consumers are like spoiled kids. That doesn't usually turn out so good for anyone. And guess whose fault that is?
  • Posted on: 11/01/2019

    What are the hurdles to international e-commerce?

    Never mind selling and shipping stuff to Europe or Asia, getting stuff just to Canada is almost impossible. A lot of my fellow authors don't even bother to try and send books there. It's just not worth the cost and hassle. With both postal and courier systems. Then there is the currency problem. As a dual citizen we were shocked by the apparent inability of banks here to deal in a foreign currency. It's like they've never heard of Canada and are surprised to learn you can drive there. With Canadian banks one can set up a USD account with ease. In most places you can get actual USD currency. Certainly not reciprocal in the U.S.! At the core of this issue is the reality that most countries don't get along with each other - sadly that is especially so when it comes to getting along with the U.S.! So many Americans put a Canadian flag sticker on their luggage or wear Canadian swag when they travel. Attitude and politics are the scourge of global e-commerce.
  • Posted on: 10/31/2019

    Are retailers out-of-step with consumers when it comes to price?

    I get both sides of the price debate, Michael, but I come down on your side. When people insist that it's not about the price...it's about the price.
  • Posted on: 10/31/2019

    Are retailers out-of-step with consumers when it comes to price?

    Way back when I was recording my graduate school research on a typewriter, I found that that as you move "up" in an organization, each succeeding level had about 10 percent more positive perceptions. In other words senior executives thought things were amazing, everyone understood the vision, were happy, etc. Those on the bottom rung differed hugely in their opinion. In this case of retailers vs. consumers the same reality gap seems to be evident. My interpretation of such results is that people "at the top" had to think everything was fine because they had no idea what to do if it wasn't. A highly paid executive sure doesn't want to admit that! More important to this discussion is a conclusion that there is no direct correlation between price and quality. Thus the disconnect in perception. In fact, I dare say there is considerable evidence that the correlation is inverse. The wealthy will pay the price because if the item falls apart prematurely, they buy another. The not so wealthy want an expensive item to last until the end of time. Nowhere is there more evidence of this than in reviews of luxury automobiles. The more you pay the less the reliability, enduring value, etc. I sadly learned that during my 12-cylinder Jaguar midlife crisis phase.
  • Posted on: 10/07/2019

    Best Buy makes a big bet on health tech

    There's no question that the "senior" crowd is growing - over twice as fast as the vaunted 18 to 45 group. Increasingly this is becoming a highly tech-savvy group though the 80-plus sector isn't quite there yet. That will soon be some of us faster than we like to admit. Given that prognosis, why is only 10 percent of market spend focused on this demographic? "24 Stats Marketers Need to Know about Baby Boomers" is a mind-blowing article. I caution about the drive to sell more and more wireless healthcare devices. The irony is they call it "health tech" when there's a growing amount of data about the negative health consequences of living in this wireless IoT soup. This is especially true for youngsters and oldsters. Most of the warning is coming from Europe, almost like the U.S. won't admit to this until there's a problem too big to ignore. The prediction is that 50 percent of the population will have "electro-hyper-sensitivity" to EMF pollution "raising new challenges for medicine and society." Then there's the increase in security risk. For example, a pacemaker has 90,000 lines of code. Start adding up software vulnerability for all these health devices and you have a hacker buffet. There is no mention of this security dimension from Best Buy, at least not in this report. Of course Best Buy should move in this direction. My net point is that there is a lot more to it than salivating over a $50 billion revenue market.
  • Posted on: 09/06/2019

    Is virtual training better than real-life role-playing?

    You make a strong and good point, Georganne. There's something irreplaceable about being physically in the middle of the blood, sweat and tears of an intense situation. What I was trying to point out is that there is a big difference between actually having an intense experience like getting fired, and pretending to have an intense experience which is itself a form of "virtuality." The pretenders typically display unrealistic behavior because, well, they're pretenders. I was thinking that perhaps there could be something close to what you describe in a virtual format. As an old weathered trainer, the other problem with VR is that it's not usually a group experience. Nothing is more boring than watching someone in VR goggles.
  • Posted on: 09/06/2019

    Starbucks developing new store dedicated to pickup and delivery orders

    Let's see what happens the first time someone has to stop suddenly coming out of the drive-thru and dumps the hot coffee in their lap. In Googling what happened to that famous McDonald's case I typed "Woman sues" and up it came. That was in 1992 and it is still talked about! She was awarded $3 million and got $640,000. Starbucks has already lost one "hot coffee" lawsuit for $100,000.
  • Posted on: 09/06/2019

    Is virtual training better than real-life role-playing?

    As one who started his career doing management and staff training, I can unequivocally say that virtual role-playing will be light years ahead of physical role-playing. In fact virtual role playing, assuming it is created well, is actually MORE real than real role-playing. Here's why. There is usually a problem role and a helping or interventionist role. I learned from my first experience that it is impossible to "win" as the good guy/gal. The problem role-player knows it is their job to thwart the helper in every way possible to the point of acting mentally deranged. So much of role playing is pretty well pointless though I did that sort of thing for years. It's a game trainers play. A virtual tool in which a problematic role that is natural, with realistic responses to intervention, will be SO much more effective. And yes, it will save a ton of money and even more time.
  • Posted on: 09/04/2019

    Will Walmart’s customers accept its rejection of the firearms ‘status quo’?

    Hey Art, I searched around for your "7 percent of guns used in a crime purchased legally" figure. Not questioning that at all, but 10 minutes of searching showed me how confused gun data collection is. Seemed like no one had the same figures. As I understand it, we're prevented from any serious gun use research thanks to the NRA. Makes me wonder, if the "more guns" cause is so good for the nation, why on earth would they not want to justify that conclusion with some accurate and insightful research? I appreciate your contribution today.
  • Posted on: 09/04/2019

    Will Walmart’s customers accept its rejection of the firearms ‘status quo’?

    I have no need to go to Walmart, but I will today - there must be something there I need. I applaud them and will support them however I can. I don't see this as "rejecting" anything, I see it as "accepting" common sense, safety, concern for their customers, their selfless thinking and so on. I've lived happily in AZ for 22 years having moved here from Toronto and taken up citizenship. Can't imagine living anywhere else. But to be honest, I still don't understand this gun thing. As in most other countries, there are lots of guns in Canada but no one talks about it. Here it's talked about more than the weather. What drives me crazy is when people talk about having guns as a "God-given right." I'm pretty confident that God had nothing to do with it and has left us to our ways. It's called "free will" and we live with the outcome of our decisions. Walmart made a great decision, God bless them.

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