PROFILE

Ian Percy

President, The Ian Percy Corporation

Ian Percy is a Possibilities Expert and the founder of The Infinite Possibilities Initiative, a process for applying principles from quantum and energetic science for exponentially higher levels of innovation and profitability. An organizational psychologist, he is one of the most acclaimed business and inspirational speakers in the world. Successful Meetings magazine declared him “One of the top 21 speakers for the 21st century” and he is one of only three speakers inducted into both the US and Canadian Speaker Halls of Fame. Ian’s remarkable ability to blend depth of insight with inspiration is sought after by a wide variety of corporations and associations.

Recently he’s developed a process that engages entire cities in ‘possibility thinking’ and in understanding that they control the collective ‘energy’ that attracts or repels new residents, investments and businesses. Many organizations are stuck in 16th century Newtonian thinking, he insists, and that makes them almost irrelevant to a 21st century marketplace. For starters, he says, we need to move far beyond ‘problem solving’ to ‘seeing possibilities’. When leaders focus on the latter, problems resolve themselves and a new and prosperous reality begins to emerge. That is the secret to building a culture of innovation!

In addition Ian is a co-founder of Verdant Technologies LLC, a company that brings advanced technologies to many sectors like sustainable energy, waste management, agriculture, water science, medical devices, electric vehicles. etc.

He has authored seven highly respected books including the breakthrough book on leadership titled: Going Deep and The Profitable Power of Purpose which challenges traditional thinking about corporate vision. His latest ebook is Make Your Life a Masterpiece, a modern English translation of James Allen’s 1902 classic As a Man Thinketh.

Ian has both Canadian and US citizenships and lives in Scottsdale, Arizona.

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  • Posted on: 03/11/2019

    Will Costco’s new $15 minimum wage hurt or benefit the chain?

    Great comment Doug -- but that last paragraph was the highlight! Brilliant insight that should be a RetailWire topic on its own.
  • Posted on: 03/11/2019

    Will Costco’s new $15 minimum wage hurt or benefit the chain?

    The answer to the first question is easy -- YES. Costco is a step above its competitors in every other way so frankly, it would be foolish for it to do anything else in compensating its employees. On the second question regarding employee relations - at least their relationships to customers - it could be better. And I say that as someone who deserves a designated parking spot at Costco. It's hard to find someone who can tell you where to find a certain cheese since, for some reason, all the cheeses are not displayed in the same area. A bigger issue is why more check-out lanes aren't open when there are 10 people standing in line waiting to give Costco their money. And one other thing -- if Canadian Costco has poutine fries, why not in Scottsdale? So Costco isn't perfect. But it is light years ahead of most everyone else.
  • Posted on: 03/04/2019

    Will pairing nail salons with shoe stores be a good fit for DSW?

    Exactly Neil. Unfortunately, too many retailers will not heed your second paragraph.
  • Posted on: 03/04/2019

    Will pairing nail salons with shoe stores be a good fit for DSW?

    Here's a term I learned from Dr. Nido Quebein, President of High Point University. When trying to blend various business activities that to some will seem like a total disconnect, what you want to ensure is "Intentional Congruity." In the DSW case having a nail salon would rate high in intentional congruity if DSW sees itself in the foot health and beauty business. What is harder to classify in this way are "beer and wine offerings" they seem to be considering. As shown in the DSW increase in sales, when you feel good about your feet after a pedicure, you'll want to extend that feeling by buying better shoes. That's intentional congruence at work! Just throwing a mix of services against the wall to see what sticks is a waste of time and money and you'll probably lose what you started with as well. On the other hand, many retailers are locked into a "stick-to-the-knitting" mentality. That was hot stuff way back when we thought "In Search of Excellence" was channeled from the divine. Now we realize that creating kind of a congruent retail ecosystem can pay off hugely. I tried to get a client in the HVAC business to consider adding an innovation in insulation to their product/service mix. All to no avail. Instead of seeing themselves in the "temperature control" business, they were stuck selling machinery just like 99 percent of their competitors. Thinking in terms of intentional congruence can differentiate you from all others. Just do it first -- you can bet DSW won't be the last shoe store to add a salon.
  • Posted on: 02/19/2019

    Influencer marketing produces a fuzzy ROI

    First, I think there's a big difference between "influencer marketing" and "word-of-mouth marketing." Personally, I regard the latter as more genuine and credible -- and I believe that it is more likely to lead to "engagement." Engagement is a personal and emotional decision one makes and not a mechanistic one that can be engineered. Regardless, it is very difficult to isolate a specific ROI for any marketing strategy. Marketing is not some lab experiment where you can control all the variables. The only exception to that is going from no marketing strategy to a marketing strategy. Net is, do sales and profitability go up or not?
  • Posted on: 02/14/2019

    Will Mastercard’s sonic identity connect with consumers on a new level?

    I want to add just a bit to my comment about how using sound in a Pavlovian way in retail is just the smallest tip of the iceberg. I mentioned that this whole arena is really about frequencies and vibration and how we can learn to use this energy to reshape our experiences. Medicine, I noted, was furthest ahead in this. This article introduces the idea that sound could replace laser frequencies in surgery. As an example, they mention the possibility of "holographic acoustical tweezers." Kind of makes having a three-note doorbell tone when you see the Mastercard logo look like child's play, doesn't it?
  • Posted on: 02/14/2019

    Will Mastercard’s sonic identity connect with consumers on a new level?

    It's not "all about sound," sound is merely a sample of what it's really all about. What it is about is frequency and vibration. We have yet to understand what Einstein, Tesla and others have tried to tell us about these forms of energy. Medicine is probably the profession most in tune with this factor, but even there we've only scratched the surface. I've seen specific frequencies embedded into paint in a high-end health spa to create a sense of wellbeing and relief just by walking in the front door. A more advanced idea than a Pavlovian tone is to explore how to reach consumers through frequencies that create an environment that literally resonates with them.
  • Posted on: 02/11/2019

    Is there really wisdom in the crowd?

    Thanks for putting the word "wisdom" in quotes. At least I'm assuming we all use quotes that way when we know the word is being misused.
  • Posted on: 02/11/2019

    Is there really wisdom in the crowd?

    Let's get some definitions straight here because it makes a huge difference. This article and the approach it's advocating has absolutely nothing to do with wisdom! At best it has to do with information. Apples to oranges for sure. Wisdom is future-focused. It's a rare gift that accesses information, experiences, intuition in order to guide us effectively into the future where there is no data - only possibilities. You'll never see the word "Wise" on the list of qualifications for any job including ... well, you know which one. Wisdom is the rarest of all attributes and the one we should all aspire to.
  • Posted on: 02/07/2019

    Are legacy retailers on the right track or heading off the tracks?

    First, the polarities table is brilliant. No retailer can escape the inevitable lifecycle. The retail idea is born, it emerges, becomes established, matures -- and dies. No exceptions. The only escape strategy is to jump to a new curve and reinvent yourself -- or what Laura called "differentiate." The problem is that most organizations see the handwriting on the wall far too late. Jumping the curve is extremely difficult; a dance between chaos and order. Few do it well. Then there is the leadership factor. It is extremely rare that any one leader is capable of or suited to lead an organization through all the life stages. Some are great at launching an enterprise but pathetic at building it. Others are useless at maintaining the status quo in the maturity phase but come alive when asked to lead the jump. I think retail executives should specialize in ONE phase of the lifecycle and then move around to help retailers who are about to experience that phase. Everyone would be so much happier and more successful.
  • Posted on: 01/28/2019

    What do shoppers really want? Do retailers have a clue?

    Laura, thank you. You stir up a thought I wish had come to me when submitting my own coment. And that is this: All the data in the world - i.e. being fully informed - doesn't make one care. Maybe this is the great myth of retail in this "modern" age. This "caring" factor several of our colleagues have mentioned has little or nothing to do with technology.
  • Posted on: 01/28/2019

    What do shoppers really want? Do retailers have a clue?

    I didn't know whether to put this comment here or into the other conversation about AI and the cloud. Since I'm a Phibbs fan and know he calls it like it is, here I go. First, is it just me or do you feel the whole world is becoming "disconnected?" This is WAY deeper than either retailer behavior or AI! It's actually a moral and a morale issue. Technology will not create a more perfect union between retailer and consumer. The problem starts with the mechanics of it all. Software guru Capers Jones once noted that software is the worst quality man-made product since the beginning of time. There are as many faults in the software that runs our consumer experience technology as there are in any salesperson's behavior and attitude. Technology will, however, enable mistakes and disconnection to happen much faster. The foundational determining factor in customer experience is whether or not someone cares. It really is that simple. Whether in a restaurant or a store, when we run into staff who truly care about us, and about their service to us, we're surprised and thrilled. I have colleagues who will write a whole book about that experience or tell that story in their speeches for years. So why is it so hard to genuinely care? I go back to my comment about the world becoming more and more disconnected. It is pretty well impossible to care if one is not cared about. In short, how we are managed is how we serve.
  • Posted on: 01/22/2019

    Can grocers sell produce without plastic bags and boxes?

    Well and succinctly said, Neil.
  • Posted on: 01/22/2019

    Can grocers sell produce without plastic bags and boxes?

    YES PLEASE! For years, like many, we've kept a bag to hold bags. Mostly plastic. But even the re-use of plasic bags does not absolve us of guilt. All that confessed, please Dear Retailer, don't make those thin plastic bags available at all. If you're going to help the planet, do it fully.
  • Posted on: 01/17/2019

    NRF: Top retailers share cultural keys to retaining employees

    I'm not sure we understand "culture" at all. The reason for that is we approach it in a mechanistic, cost-benefit, check-off-the-box kind of way ... whereas it's wholly a spiritual and belief issue. That's a level of engagement very few companies explore. This article focuses on discovering what the recruit's passions are. Nowhere did I see a reference to any attempt at describing what the organizations' "culture" is. I'm sorry but an "impromptu dance party" is not an example of "flourishing" culture. Guaranteed once the music is turned off employees are thinking "What are we going to do next time?" Then we have the suggestion that culture is related to values, whatever they are. EVERY organization has some kind of bullet point value statement just like they all have vision and mission statements. I probably shouldn't even get started here ... but here's why I think 90 percent of value statements are superficial mush. Any one of us, with remarkable accuracy, can list the "values" of any company in the country sight-unseen. "Honesty" or "integrity" has to be near the top. How long did that discussion take? What were your other choices? Gotta stick "communication' in there somewhere. Then there needs to be some version of "our people are our greatest resource." For the most part it's a flip chart exercise. Putting deeply held beliefs on the table and then identifying factors in the organization that contradict or affirm those beliefs in order to bring beliefs and behavior into alignment is a gut wrenching exercise. One simple example and I'll quit. If our people are our greatest resource, where do we look first in order to cut costs?

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