PROFILE

David Weinand

Chief Customer Officer, Incisiv
Weinand is the co-founder and chief customer officer for Incisiv, a consumer industry insights firm that works with the ecosystem of retailers, brands, restaurants and technology providers on benchmarking services, go to market strategy, and content services. Prior to Incisiv, Weinand spent nine years at Edgell Communications/Ensemble IQ in various roles that included GM of the technology portfolio, publisher of RIS News and co-founder of EKN Research. To learn more, visit: www.incisiv.io
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  • Posted on: 11/06/2018

    Facebook delivers digital brands to the Market @ Macy’s for Christmas

    Uniqueness and experience are today's currency for brick-and-mortar retailers and we've profiled several of Macy's initiatives in this forum over the last few months. I know they placing a LOT of their future strategy on the marketplace "retail as a service" concept so this is a natural evolution for the brand. With the campaigns and the PR, I do think this will drive traffic and, yes, I'm sure one or more of the brands will break out and grow at rates not otherwise possible without this partnership. Go Macy's!
  • Posted on: 11/01/2018

    Shoppable ads need to tone down the sales pitch

    The CTA is heavily dependent on the complexity of the product. Shop Now CTAs for basics are probably fine. When you have variables like technical specs, or fit/size - absolutely the CTA should be to "Learn More." Retargeting is still pretty rudimentary -- I constantly hear complaints about companies that re-target for the same or similar item that they just bought. There's definitely an opportunity here but the offers have to get smarter.
  • Posted on: 10/30/2018

    Why are Foot Locker and Nike sending ‘sneakerheads’ on AR scavenger hunts?

    For any retailer with a younger demographic, these types of experiences can absolutely be applied. They can help to deepen the passion for the brand and rather than requiring the consumer to meet the retailer or brand on their terms (in-store or online), these experiences meet the consumer where they are and where they want to be. Brilliant.
  • Posted on: 10/30/2018

    Is Sam’s reimagining the future of warehouse clubs?

    What I find most encouraging about seeing stories like this is that they are no longer "ground breaking" -- which means that there are a lot of legacy retailers that are making concerted efforts to adapt their models, leverage new technologies and redefine their associates' roles. To quote Austin Powers: "Yay capitalism." Walmart has continued to push the envelope so I will assume that Sam's will take the most successful aspects of the "lab" and roll them out across the chain. Costco is certainly no slouch and they have never been a follower so while they will be watching, they will undergo initiatives that they feel are right for their chain.
  • Posted on: 10/23/2018

    Brands are simply guests on Amazon’s platform and that’s okay

    It really doesn't matter whether we think Amazon is overstepping its bounds -- As Kiri points out, it's their sandbox. Brands aren't going to win on the budget angle so the key is to understand what other imperatives consumers really care about and market against those. Does the consumer care about the product's materials or sourcing? Does the consumer care that the product will fit into a broader narrative of how they want to look? There are ways brands can win in the Amazon ecosystem. They just have to be laser focused on the needs of their consumers.
  • Posted on: 10/23/2018

    Why haven’t CPG giants figured out what makes small brands so popular?

    As you point out - the barriers to entry for small brands have been eased with the advent of direct-to-consumer options. In addition, consumer preferences are changing to lead with healthier options, more transparent sourcing and more efficient means to acquire. Big CPGs have been stuck in the traditional distribution channels and rely heavily on brand extensions rather than new, innovative products (how many more different kinds of Oreos can they make?). Legacy CPGs, like so many of the large enterprise companies across industries, are stuck in heavily process-oriented cultures where innovation is difficult. As we've seen, many have realized this and have gone on acquisition sprees of smaller, more nimble brands. That is the way to go forward for them so that they can start to better understand new distribution channels and new ways to appeal to today's consumer.
  • Posted on: 10/22/2018

    How should retail employers prepare for Gen Z workers?

    Job security, professional growth, feedback - if all of these things are identifiers of Gen Z -- to me they don't sound any different than how we described other generations like Gen X or Boomers. Yes, digitally native is a big difference and the way they communicate may change to include digital, but if employers can go about treating their people with strong practices that apply to any generation, they'll fare well.
  • Posted on: 10/17/2018

    New c-store concept is high-tech inside and out

    I don't see this as particularly revolutionary, more like evolutionary. Electric cars (and other things like bikes and scooters) will grow in popularity and with them, the need for charging. Smart that they are thinking about creative ways for customers to spend time in-store and the move to fresh is just a continuation of a trend the likes of Wawa and others are jumping on.
  • Posted on: 10/17/2018

    Eddie Lampert is the worst

    We're not in the trenches to see exactly what went on but certainly from the periphery and knowing all of the financial hijinx he has implemented at Sears to personally benefit from Sears' slow demise - I'd have to say "hell yeah" -- not only the worst retail executive ever, one of the worst human beings ever ....
  • Posted on: 10/16/2018

    ‘Frictionless’ is the annoying word of the year

    Frictionless has to mean different things to different people. You're absolutely right. If the term is defined in the context of what the 'friction' is in that particular use case, it becomes pretty clear. However, most in the retail ecosystem do tend to latch onto buzzwords and use them freely, without regard to putting them into context and it then creates confusion (dare I say, friction?) and becomes meaningless. Not to worry Paula -- another buzzword is around the corner!
  • Posted on: 10/16/2018

    Walmart and Advance Auto Parts join forces online

    Demographically it's really a great match. I would think that the shopper profile for both Walmart and Advance is very similar. This is just another in a long line of really smart moves by Walmart to literally become the one-stop shop for millions.
  • Posted on: 10/15/2018

    Will J.C. Penney’s new private brand connect with Instagram-savvy moms?

    Good call out Ricardo -- but the story does mention the Instagram campaign is for "moms." I just don't know how many moms are on that platform.
  • Posted on: 10/15/2018

    Shopify opens a storefront to support its online merchants

    Creating an environment for value-added services like this in a highly concentrated independent merchant area is a great move for Shopify. If they can can help their merchants better their chances for success, what better marketing tool is there? They'll add loyalty to the platform and ensure long term clients.
  • Posted on: 10/08/2018

    Will the Birchbox/Walgreens pilot deliver beautiful results?

    Beauty, as we know, is big business and if this helps Walgreens to improve merchandise and offer something unique in their stores, it's a win. While Birchbox was an early player in beauty subscription services, they haven't kept up with their competition (my wife and daughters have done both Birchbox and Sephora and Sephora is hand's down a better offering) so perhaps this will give Birchbox some extra capital to improve their service.
  • Posted on: 10/05/2018

    There may be benefits to adding uncertainty to rewards programs

    I don't know that the example really points to the fact that in retail, uncertain loyalty rewards will win. The discovery aspect is definitely real and the subscription service examples are a good reference point (also it is behind the success of TJX). Gamification in loyalty programs has been a proven winner but I think the certainty of the rewards has more appeal than the inverse.

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