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Bob Andersen

Chief Brand Builder, Brandbuilder99
Writer. Marketer. Rainmaker.
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  • Posted on: 11/05/2019

    Is Amazon starting to fall out of favor with American consumers?

    Amazon is not always the cheapest option. If Walmart can beat Amazon's prices they will continue to take share away from Amazon.
  • Posted on: 10/30/2019

    Will free deliveries for Prime members make Amazon the driving force in online grocery?

    Completely agree. Whole Foods' same-store sales had been declining for two years before Amazon bought them. Plus, no one seems to get that grocery delivery will NEVER appeal to the majority of customers who want to SEE and touch their fresh meat and produce BEFORE they buy.
  • Posted on: 10/07/2019

    Best Buy makes a big bet on health tech

    Best Buy's core customers are or were baby boomers which is the right demographic and BBY is positioned perfectly to take advantage. But BBY is a merchant-driven, not a marketing-driven company. This is a huge opportunity, but to fully leverage, BBY will need to commit an equal amount in resources to effectively market, advertise and promote. We'll see.
  • Posted on: 09/23/2019

    Amazon steps up on climate change, sort of

    Maybe Amazon should step up to save the Amazon rain forest.
  • Posted on: 09/18/2019

    Are grocers falling short in selling better-for-you foods?

    Maybe it will evolve to where one food category is all stocked in the same aisle, but healthier products are simply grouped together. Shoppers can then easily locate their preference with no additional signage needed. The cereal aisle seems to be going in that direction in some stores.
  • Posted on: 09/04/2019

    Will Walmart’s customers accept its rejection of the firearms ‘status quo’?

    Maybe the thumbs down is the negative reaction to the special interests who now have greater influence than the American people.
  • Posted on: 09/04/2019

    Simple answers to fix retail’s loyalty marketing mess

    Retailers have to remember that loyalty programs are created to reward your CORE customers (the 20% that account for 80% of your sales.) Price discounts are OK, but surprise your core customers with other perks that will be highly valued by them.
  • Posted on: 09/04/2019

    Will Walmart’s customers accept its rejection of the firearms ‘status quo’?

    Exactly. Retailers and others must step up because in this country, special interests (NRA) can control politicians (GOP) to make policy even when it's against the wishes of the majority.
  • Posted on: 08/08/2019

    Whole Foods gets serious about partying

    "The products they offer at Whole Foods will all be recyclable."
  • Posted on: 08/06/2019

    What are the signs of a dying retail business?

    One thing missed was loss of market share. Even if your sales increase, but at a slower rate than the overall market for your products, you're losing customers.
  • Posted on: 08/02/2019

    Will its ‘best of’ designer sale trigger a massive run on Target?

    Agree. Like "sale," "limited supplies" will always create a buzz. Making an event out of it makes it even more exciting. Plus it reinforces why Target is successful: They stick to their positioning as an upscale discounter, aka cheap chic. This is key because it attracts middle- and upper-income consumers – a much larger customer base to tap from than other discounters like Walmart.
  • Posted on: 07/30/2019

    How do brands maintain their cool?

    A cool brand image can be created and maintained with creative advertising. With Apple it started with their iconic Super Bowl ad in 1984. Nike even changed their brand positioning from discount shoes in the '70s to a premium brand in the '80s with their "Just Do It" ad campaign. Thirty years later both brands maintain their coolness with edgy advertising. Clever brand stunts can also boost a cool image. Remember the Tesla in space with rocket man at the wheel? The Colin Kaepernick "controversies" have reinvigorated the Nike brand. Accident or brilliant strategy? Clothing brand Diesel cleverly combined the trendy "pop-up" shop concept with a brand stunt when they opened a one-off store in an area of Manhattan known for offering cheap fakes of well-known brand names. To make sure customers thought the items were truly knock-offs, the T-shirts, hats and jeans were labeled with Diesel misspelled as “Deisel”. But all of the items were genuine Diesel products made in their manufacturing plant in Italy and sent to the pop-up shop on Canal Street. The store was only open for two days, but the stunt gained invaluable PR and the company recorded customer interactions and featured them in ads making the prank a longer term win for Diesel.
  • Posted on: 07/26/2019

    Is DoorDash ‘doing the right thing’ for delivery people?

    Tipping should be done only where service is being provided over a period of time, like at a restaurant. For simple transactions, like a delivery or counter service, most consumers would likely prefer the tip be included in the price of the service. Consumers don't want to be forced to decide whether to tip and if so, calculate how much. There's always the nagging question: Did I give enough, too much?
  • Posted on: 07/25/2019

    Has Amazon ‘destroyed the retail industry’ in the U.S.?

    Mnuchin dislikes Amazon because, like Trump, he dislikes the Washington Post, owned by Bezos. Adding trillions in debt every year is the real threat to retail and all industries. Mnuchin should focus his "talent" on finding ways to balance the federal budget.
  • Posted on: 07/24/2019

    Will parachutes provide drones with a soft landing for home deliveries?

    The chances of this ever taking off are remote.
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