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Also from Herb Sorensen, Ph.D....

Braintrust Resource

TNS Global Retail & Shopper Practice
Selling Like Amazon... ...in Bricks & Mortar Stores!
Whitepaper (pdf)

Links by Herb

 
[Image of: Herb Sorensen, Ph.D.]

Herb Sorensen, Ph.D.

Scientific Advisor TNS Global Retail & Shopper
Shopper Scientist LLC

If the retail lab is run by some techie whiz with tools up the wazoo, or a merchant-warehouseman retailer with supply chain skills, it won't amount to much. On the other hand if it is run by a salesman with Jeff Bezos's instincts, then it's Katie bar the door!...

You want "reality"? Techies with new toys think they will change a world that their understanding of is near zilch. Best retailer quote: "Why would we do these things if no one is paying us to?" And notice the brain-dead strategy of "paying customers to buy," AKA price promotions...

Every purchase in the supermarket falls in one of two categories: 1. Surprise/Delight/NOW! 2. Routine/Autopilot/Angst.

Category one virtually belongs to the brick-and-mortar store and category two virtually belongs online. For the brick-and-mortar retailer, failure to provide their own efficient online service very well spells the death knell, in the long...

Several points occur, the first of which is Scott McNealy's (Sun Microsystems) observation more than a dozen years ago that "You have no privacy, get over it!" The development described in these articles is certainly going to happen. I've pointed out before that all the information in the universe...

Amazon, Google and Apple are probably the world's premier consumer technology companies (backward-facing to the business market) and will possibly be for decades to come. Thinking in one big silo, or a few large ones, could be a serious mistake for any one of the three. They are all...

All purchases can be divided into one of two groups: 1. Surprise/Delight/NOW! and 2. Routine/Autopilot/Angst. The first is virtually owned by bricks retailers, although some surprise/delight might be delivered, mostly in an inferior way, by online. Heck, most bricks retailers deliver it in an inferior way.

But NOW!, immediacy of...

Stuff and piffle! Are we talking a lady's fine gown, a tent for camping, new computer or something on the 2.3 trips per week to the supermarket? Let's get real. Lot's of people are trying to magnify the role of digital. It doesn't mean that it is not relevant,...

This move is stupid almost beyond belief. Stores like Target readily hit a "traffic ceiling" because it is a fact that you do not need anything Target sells as often as you need air, water and food, to get basic about it. Beverages and food attract people to grocery...

This is all good, but Walmart is missing a beat—as everyone else is, too. Getting people to buy online is a no-brainer: just copy Amazon, period. Using those sales to build in-store traffic and sales is being ignored—wholesale. Gotta wait for Amazon to buy bricks stores in order to...

  1. "Letting go" is the WRONG strategy. It's VERY hard, if not impossible, to do a negative — like don't eat fattening food. You must have something beyond that attracts you more than what you are leaving. The real question is, NEXT?

    Some people have a hard time letting go...

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