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Also from Herb Sorensen, Ph.D....

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[Image of: Herb Sorensen, Ph.D.]

Herb Sorensen, Ph.D.

Scientific Advisor TNS Global Retail & Shopper
Shopper Scientist LLC

And considering foodservice vs. "other retail" should be seen in the context that there are two grand classes of purchases, that ALL purchases can be slotted into: 1. Surprise/Delight/NOW! and 2. Routine/Autopilot/Angst.

The first class will probably ALWAYS be an advantage for bricks-and-mortar retailing, and the second is the natural...

It is very important to think of this in terms of the three distinct components of a sale: 1. The meeting of the minds of buyer and seller saying "Yes to the dress!" 2. The actual delivery of the offer, whether by the typical "stock-picker" shopper, by Amazon drone...

Chat, like a lot else, comes down to how intelligently the retailer does it. Some are really good and some are mediocre-to-poor. Surprise!

I use chat fairly often myself across a wide range of sites and think it is a good idea. But some are clearly better at it than...

Excellent question here. I have long wondered at the massive "parked capital" represented by malls. But that is a larger problem which is addressed, aggressively, by online shopping. However, I insist that, "As long as people live in bricks-and-mortar houses, they will shop in bricks-and-mortar stores!" And...

I find it shocking that there are still players in this business for whom the terms "big head" and "long tail" are mysteries, even though the DISTINCT management of these two classes of merchandise are the foundation of intelligent retailing to shoppers. I've said it before: 100 years ago...

This article makes perfect sense, EXCEPT it ignores how retailers make their profit, and the impact of removing checkout on that profit. Retailers typically operate with close to zero net margins, and make their REAL profit from selling access to their in-store AUDIENCE. This means they are media companies,...

It's an Apple Store, just with a different range of merchandise, and which varies the on-the-floor level of service appropriate to different categories.

And YES, this IS the way to take a 40,000 square foot store with 50,000 SKUs on the shelves to a 10,000 foot store with maybe a...

There is nothing particularly new about this line of thought, although getting specific in a patent application may be new. And note that an application is NOT a patent. I have been having conversations with retailers and their suppliers for at least 10 years about the disappearance of checkout—a...

Great idea! We'll soon know if there are more problems in implementation, but this goes right to the heart of the most important part of selling: The customer making up their mind and saying YES, I want this item. Amazon launched on this road years ago when they patented...

Personally, I don't think retailers have a discount monkey on their backs—they've got it in their heads. And it comes from several sources:

1. They are not salesmen, but merchant warehousemen, to whom shopping is all about the price.

2. They believe that shoppers are as obsessed about prices as they...

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