PROFILE

Ian Percy

President, The Ian Percy Corporation

Ian Percy is a Possibilities Expert and the founder of The Infinite Possibilities Initiative, a process for applying principles from quantum and energetic science for exponentially higher levels of innovation and profitability. An organizational psychologist, he is one of the most acclaimed business and inspirational speakers in the world. Successful Meetings magazine declared him “One of the top 21 speakers for the 21st century” and he is one of only three speakers inducted into both the US and Canadian Speaker Halls of Fame. Ian’s remarkable ability to blend depth of insight with inspiration is sought after by a wide variety of corporations and associations.

Recently he’s developed a process that engages entire cities in ‘possibility thinking’ and in understanding that they control the collective ‘energy’ that attracts or repels new residents, investments and businesses. Many organizations are stuck in 16th century Newtonian thinking, he insists, and that makes them almost irrelevant to a 21st century marketplace. For starters, he says, we need to move far beyond ‘problem solving’ to ‘seeing possibilities’. When leaders focus on the latter, problems resolve themselves and a new and prosperous reality begins to emerge. That is the secret to building a culture of innovation!

In addition Ian is a co-founder of Verdant Technologies LLC, a company that brings advanced technologies to many sectors like sustainable energy, waste management, agriculture, water science, medical devices, electric vehicles. etc.

He has authored seven highly respected books including the breakthrough book on leadership titled: Going Deep and The Profitable Power of Purpose which challenges traditional thinking about corporate vision. His latest ebook is Make Your Life a Masterpiece, a modern English translation of James Allen’s 1902 classic As a Man Thinketh.

Ian has both Canadian and US citizenships and lives in Scottsdale, Arizona.

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  • Posted on: 07/27/2017

    Can in-store experiences save retail?

    I don't know anyone who understands this better than you, Tony!
  • Posted on: 07/27/2017

    Are post-merger culture clashes inevitable?

    "If you suck them into your existing machines, you’ll kill it. That happens a lot, and it’s unfortunate.” I don't know if I've ever seen a RetailWire article with which I agree more. Adam is totally on target here. In my forty years of organizational consulting I've seen exactly the scenario Adam describes more times than I can count. Organizations are acquired and then destroyed for exactly the same reason. Usually that reason is a lack of blind obedience to bureaucracy, an abundance of creativity and innovation and innate cultural energy.This is overly simplistic but there are two dimensions that need to be considered in any blend of culture: TASK and MAINTENANCE. Task is all the financial stuff, equipment, space, head-count, brand - anything that can be decided in a board room by the suits. Maintenance is about maintaining cultural spirit. This includes the energy, relationships, understanding and communication between the two parties. The American way is to focus entirely on task and only then if there is a problem do leaders try to deal with maintenance or cultural breakdown. That is usually too much trouble and it's easier to kill off the annoying newcomers.What works is to do it in exactly the opposite way: maintenance first then task. Bring the two parties together to interact, get to know each other, get a sense of the energy, have people explore and hopefully get excited about what might be possible if we were to all work together, etc. Live together before marriage in other words. Start with a happy hour.BOTH cultures will need to adapt to the other, there is no way around that. But to think that the group being acquired will abandon their culture and way of thinking in favor of their new masters' is plain foolish.
  • Posted on: 07/26/2017

    Can in-store experiences save retail?

    On the mark Ralph. You said it much more succinctly than I did.
  • Posted on: 07/26/2017

    Can in-store experiences save retail?

    Apparently I don't want an interesting and engaging experience when I go retail shopping. What I really want is for that retailer to "have a deep understanding" of me. Do I have that right? You know, I've come out of a lot of shops being impressed with the range of inventory and how informed and helpful a salesperson was or what a good deal I got. But I've never come away thinking "Boy, did they ever have a deep understanding of what my life is all about."Are most retailers risk adverse and set in their ways? Duh. That's about the only comment I'd give a nod to. Professor Fader says you can't "wow" everyone en masse, though that is exactly what Big Data efforts try to do. "Individuality" in the Big Data world is a myth. So how, exactly, is a store going to show a deep understanding of my needs?The local Hyundai dealer is having a "Big Tent" promotion with balloons, special t-shirts and lots of fan fare. I dropped in to see my next car, the Genesis 80. $52,000! I looked over the car. Sat in it. Took one of the expensive brochures and left without a single person saying hello. I'm sure Genesis does all kinds of deep data consumer research.I went into the local Ace Hardware yesterday to get PVC cement. Pretty mindless stuff. The Ace guy takes me to the aisle and I make a comment about how quickly this stuff seems to dry up. The Ace guy agrees and says that if I'm not a plumber I'd save in the long run by buying the small container. $4.73. Then he shows me some other stuff about putting PVC together. I'm impressed and not once did I think about saving 60 cents by driving seven miles to the Home Depot. And he did all that with NO DATA on me whatsoever! It was a positive informative experience, no razzle-dazzle needed. The secret sauce? Serve people intelligently!
  • Posted on: 07/20/2017

    How much Big Data do retailers really need?

    Your comment reminds me of a book I wrote a while back, Lyle. I was going to title it "The Most Difficult Question in the Universe." I didn't, but I did ask a bunch of elementary school kids what they thought the most difficult question was. The best of them was from an eight-year-old girl who suggested: "Who are you and what do you want?" She'd make a great contribution to retail research today! :)
  • Posted on: 07/20/2017

    How much Big Data do retailers really need?

    Sometimes the problem is the answer. If the problem is that retailers aren't finding value and joy in Big Data, maybe the answer is to stop spending all your time, energy and money on trying to do so.Look ... weedkiller is, fundamentally, too much fertilizer. Too much fertilizer kills plants. Too much data just may kill retail.At some point we need to ask: Is Big Data making retail a more energizing, fun and rewarding way to spend one's life? Or is it exhausting us all?
  • Posted on: 07/18/2017

    Is Best Buy’s latest Geek Squad service a blueprint for niche IoT?

    Best Buy has the potential to own this niche, IF ...I tried the services of the Geek Squad when you had to go find them in the store and then leave your computer with them for goodness knows how long. Not once did I have a "wow" experience based on the supposed genius of those in the Squad. It typically ended with a decision to go somewhere else and eventually to subscribe to a remote-access computer service that had both PC and Mac experts.So my "IF" is totally based on Best Buy's ability to recruit enough brilliant tech people. That, of course, will be costly. My understanding is that this will be a subscription model which is the way to go. However, it won't take but one or two disappointments for customers to abandon this service.
  • Posted on: 07/12/2017

    Why do so many people love shopping at Ace Hardware?

    It's all been said above -- I just want to add my kudos to Ace.Finding the right adapter for a pipe is about 3.8 miles closer than at the big box stores. And that's measuring it from the front door.
  • Posted on: 07/11/2017

    Are retailers measuring omnichannel all wrong?

    First, I read most everything with Nikki Baird's name on it.The "engagement-minute" is a brilliant insight and, at least theoretically, is a much better metric than all the other stuff we make up in our desperation to understand and persuade the consumer. I don't know if that phrase originates with Nikki or not, but If no one has trademarked the term, she should!Where I still struggle, however, is where does the actual measurement come from? For example the question: "What about the amount of time the customer spent at home researching coming into the store?" How exactly do we find a reliable number to put into the calculation?So I get the "why" of engagement-minute metrics but I don't get the "how."
  • Posted on: 07/10/2017

    Will consumers ever feel better about sharing their data?

    Do I understand that retail wants to collect and manipulate all my personal information with all the risks and invasiveness that brings with it ... but they now want me to actually like it? How endearing.It may be too late, but I'd direct retailers who think they "own" the consumer and have a "right" to their data to the Province of Ontario and their application of "Privacy by Design" principles. You can find it here. Pay particular attention to the Seven Foundational Principles of such a strategy.Retail has already dug a hole around pricing battles and now it begins another even deeper one around privacy battles.
  • Posted on: 07/05/2017

    How can retailers make loyalty programs more effective?

    Ryan, that address idea is brilliant!
  • Posted on: 07/05/2017

    How can retailers make loyalty programs more effective?

    The "Thumbs Up" button wasn't working for me this morning, Art, thus I am commenting. Your point about boredom may be the cornerstone of this discussion. Almost everything in our universe brings a yawn. Whether we're talking about hotel rooms, clothing stores or automobiles where, with the exception of models I can't afford, they all look the same.A sad thing is happening in human evolution. Researchers say people have an eight second attention span and so we feed into it. Executives want everything on a single page (or two if it's life threatening) because they can't read anything longer than that, and entrepreneurs are told they have to summarize their entire vision into a 60 second elevator pitch. I differ from your comments only in that I don't think technology is the answer, I think it's the problem.
  • Posted on: 07/05/2017

    How can retailers make loyalty programs more effective?

    Again with the loyalty myth.Before responding I looked up the 2016 "loyalty" statistics. You can find them here. Read through this partial list of the research results and then tell me how good you feel about this whole initiative; about retail's desperate effort to figure us all out. Spoiler alert -- it can't be done.One interesting debate still rages and that's about which is more important: a.) retaining your good customers; or b.) attracting new ones. Everyone will answer "both" and so where does that leave us? The Forrester organization says that 66 percent of financial executives say their strategic priority is getting new customers. Isn't that contradictory to the very notion of "loyalty?" No surprise that it was financial executives who were asked.First, we have five times too many retailers in pretty well every category with most of them using the same "me-too" strategies. Maybe we need to go back and focus more on serving than on statistics. Serve me well with reasonable prices while periodically giving me something new to look at so I keep coming back. If you can do some form of customization thing that may help for a short while.I'm loyal to Costco because it's Costco and there is always something new to try, our local Safeway because they are really nice people and it's close, and to Harold's Cave Creek Corral especially for Happy Hour when they have the best wings on the planet. That's about it. Analyze that.
  • Posted on: 06/29/2017

    Has CVS gone too far with its health kick?

    Totally agree, Stephen, well said. There is no such thing as partial commitment. If CVS is intent on being purpose-driven, then drive! Higher purpose + efficient process = sustainable profitability.
  • Posted on: 06/29/2017

    Has CVS gone too far with its health kick?

    My first reaction was to wonder what exactly is meant by a health "kick." That sort of implies that health is a passing fad or some sort of secret pleasure. Doesn't "health" pretty well equate to "life?" "Kick" is usually used in phrases like "Kick the bucket."So when CVS stops selling stuff known to kill 480,000 annually in the U.S. alone -- one out of every five deaths with an annual cost of $300 BILLION -- why is there a debate at all about that decision? Was that merely part of a health kick?The truth is we have very little idea what we're doing to our bodies with the application of topicals and the consumption of everything else. So here we have a major retailer telling us they are going to do this research for us and let us know what is not harmful (if not healthy) for us to buy. 25 percent of school kids don't drink pure water on a daily basis -- but drinks loaded with sugar pretty well all the time. The decision to do something about candy/sugar consumption for kids especially is admirable. Heck, 68.8 percent of U.S. adults are FAT. 75 percent of men!CVS is trying to save us from ourselves. Let's go there and buy something healthy just to help out!

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