PROFILE

Ian Percy

President, The Ian Percy Corporation

Ian Percy is a Possibilities Expert and the founder of The Infinite Possibilities Initiative, a process for applying principles from quantum and energetic science for exponentially higher levels of innovation and profitability. An organizational psychologist, he is one of the most acclaimed business and inspirational speakers in the world. Successful Meetings magazine declared him “One of the top 21 speakers for the 21st century” and he is one of only three speakers inducted into both the US and Canadian Speaker Halls of Fame. Ian’s remarkable ability to blend depth of insight with inspiration is sought after by a wide variety of corporations and associations.

Recently he’s developed a process that engages entire cities in ‘possibility thinking’ and in understanding that they control the collective ‘energy’ that attracts or repels new residents, investments and businesses. Many organizations are stuck in 16th century Newtonian thinking, he insists, and that makes them almost irrelevant to a 21st century marketplace. For starters, he says, we need to move far beyond ‘problem solving’ to ‘seeing possibilities’. When leaders focus on the latter, problems resolve themselves and a new and prosperous reality begins to emerge. That is the secret to building a culture of innovation!

In addition Ian is a co-founder of Verdant Technologies LLC, a company that brings advanced technologies to many sectors like sustainable energy, waste management, agriculture, water science, medical devices, electric vehicles. etc.

He has authored seven highly respected books including the breakthrough book on leadership titled: Going Deep and The Profitable Power of Purpose which challenges traditional thinking about corporate vision. His latest ebook is Make Your Life a Masterpiece, a modern English translation of James Allen’s 1902 classic As a Man Thinketh.

Ian has both Canadian and US citizenships and lives in Scottsdale, Arizona.

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  • Posted on: 07/20/2016

    How can retailers gain something useful from employee surveys?

    And another thing ...I'm a little surprised by how so many of us think employee surveys are so wonderful. According to Forbes: "With all the costs and efforts to administer employee surveys, the average employee survey response rate is just a meager 30%-40%." That may tell you more than the survey results do. Notice how the response rate matches almost perfectly the engagement level.
  • Posted on: 07/20/2016

    How can retailers gain something useful from employee surveys?

    First, anonymously checking off a box on a scale does not mean anyone is actually being "heard." Being heard means an actual conversation happens. Sending out a survey is an obligation like having a mission statement or doing performance reviews. It's the annual "here we go again" experience. Sending out a survey is so much easier than an executive going in and having an honest, heart-to-heart conversation with people.Second, the old "keep, stop and start" model needs to be thrown out. At best, these questions are about the organization. Where's the question about the person? Where do you ask what their dreams are? Do you ask them what talents and abilities remain totally untapped by their employer? Or where they feel let down, betrayed or abandoned? The "we care" thing in most organizations is made up by PR departments. When executives really do care (and there are amazing examples) everyone knows it energetically and intuitively. If you have to annually tell your employees ... you don't.Third, most of the survey questions are softballs if not meaningless mush. I've found I get faster to the heart of things by asking questions employees ask each other when they go out for a drink Friday afternoon. I call them Wicked Questions. Examples: "The one problem that never gets talked about around here is ... " "If I had a boatload of money to invest in this company I'd put it into ... " "If we as a company really had the courage and will, we'd ... "Fourth, when's the last time you ever saw how the senior executives completed the survey? The answer most of the time is never. Surveys tend to be about "them." If you really want information compare how a. senior executives, b. middle management and c. rank-and-file employees respond to the same questions. THAT would be enlightening and understanding the gap would reap huge rewards.Finally, if surveys are so useful, how come Gallup continues to report employee engagement at 33.9 percent and falling? Survey that!
  • Posted on: 07/19/2016

    What does it take to compete in an off-price retail world?

    "Grunge" is throwback? Feels like that was last month. I have to get out more.Look, even the term "off-price" is weird. The price is the price. I guess the idea is that off-price means it's cheaper than the price the manufacturer was hoping for. As happens so often retail, once again, suffers from self-inflicted wounds.For some reason lately we've had several items here at RetailWire about the legitimacy and honesty of MSRP. Almost bought a watch yesterday -- $69 -- regular price $500! Then I found I could buy the same thing for $69 in all kinds of places and some said the regular price was $200. Consumers seem to conclude that MSRP is a fantasy, a made up thing hoping the buyer is rich enough not to care. Jos A. Bank used to put out those buy one get four deals and we all wondered how they can make money doing that. Well of course they're making money and so the MSRP on each suit is deemed phony. It also conjured up images of children at sewing machines in some jungle factory. How else could they sell them so cheap and still make money?Retail needs to get hold of this. We don't trust or like banks. We don't trust or like airlines. Hopefully we don't add retail to the list. In our house off-price Kohl's rules.
  • Posted on: 07/18/2016

    What’s creating the pricing disconnects between retailers and vendors?

    No surprise here. In ANY human-driven system, the gap in perceptions and behaviors widens as you move back from the end-point of that system. In examining customer or employee engagement and satisfaction, for example, it is not at all uncommon for senior executives of the company to think everything is wonderful. As you go down through the hierarchical layers of the organization to the customer-facing employee the perceptions and behaviors get significantly more negative. The final step, of course, is asking the actual customer what they think.The same diminishing perceptions principle seems to be happening in this "pricing disconnect." Frankly, pricing is probably just one manifestation of disconnection between manufacturer and retailer. Dealing with things you can attach numbers to is a lot easier to deal with than human issues like trust and transparency.Relevant to this topic, we had an item in RetailWire the other day about customer distrust of honesty in the MSRP. So if you think there is confusion between manufacturers and retailers, just add in the customer!
  • Posted on: 07/15/2016

    What is Starbucks baking up with its latest investment?

    I thought of you immediately in reading this item, Tony, and knew you understood what I'm talking about. BTW...you promised me your lasagna recipe 423 days and 14 hours ago...but whenever you have the chance! Not sure I can replicate it, but am eager to try. You have a good weekend too.
  • Posted on: 07/15/2016

    What is Starbucks baking up with its latest investment?

    Yes it is. Wish I had said that, Patricia! Fits exactly with what I was thinking in my commentary.
  • Posted on: 07/15/2016

    What is Starbucks baking up with its latest investment?

    Everything that will ever be possible is already possible. Whether or not Starbucks and Princi access that possibility is another question.Baking gets down to tested and addictive recipes and natural, chemical-free ingredients. When you have people who have a baker's soul (as distinct from having a job in a bakery) and you have those quality ingredients ... it should work. However these recipes, if truly artisan, were probably originally designed for a large Italian family dinner, and don't necessarily scale to huge vats with ingredients dumped in with a front-loader. That may be the concern as far as scalability goes. The spirit of your Italian grandmother's hands have to be in there somehow. Know what I mean? Replicating recipes is one thing ... replicating soul is quite another.It can be done. So why not have Princi bakery hubs, each serving several dozen Starbucks and being directly accessible by the public at the same time? Keep the process honest and don't try to automate everything just to make more money. Does that work as an economic model? I don't know. Those who pay the price for a cup of coffee at Starbucks will surely pay for a truly amazing bakery item. Heck, I go to Panera Bread just for the scones. The true test of any restaurant is the quality of its bread and baked goods.
  • Posted on: 07/13/2016

    How far should brands go with functional packaging?

    Excellent. Would have given you two thumbs if I could Tom. And thanks for alluding to arguably our most famous Canadian philosopher. The medium is still the message.
  • Posted on: 07/13/2016

    How far should brands go with functional packaging?

    The big question is that, while something is reusable, is it actually reused in any meaningful way? And what qualifies as "engagement?"The intention is probably admirable, but much of this is like the toy in a kid's meal. The engagement lasts what ... 60 seconds and then it's more plastic into the landfill. More meaningful would be that the shoe box could be cut into pre-addressed postcards kids could write on and mail to the troops or into a coupon for a free cup of coffee you give to a homeless person.Finally, I'd advocate for chemical-free packaging both in the material itself and in inks used. That would engage me.
  • Posted on: 07/11/2016

    Target launches $1 billion kids line

    You get cards?
  • Posted on: 07/11/2016

    Are self-checkouts dooming impulse purchases?

    I don't think I've ever purchased an "impulse item" at a checkout so that either makes me the wrong one to ask ... or the perfect one to ask.First of all, let's admit that most impulse stuff at checkout is crap. Second, and maybe this is just my ineptness, SCOs still take a lot of concentration. Some items have multiple bar codes (won't mention names but initials are HD), some don't fit in the adjacent bag, the process differs from store to store, do you chip or don't chip and so on. And you want me to buy breath mints or the latest Kardashian news?Shep has it right, impulse triggers have nothing to do with checking out ... which is why it's called "checking out." I also wonder why the irresistible "As Seen on TV" impulse isn't used more often. I keep thinking about buying that spray sealer stuff even though I don't really need it and have no idea where to find it at "HD." If that was stuck out somewhere I'd yield to the impulse. There's some wipes that make my car brand new too.
  • Posted on: 07/11/2016

    Target launches $1 billion kids line

    Amazing things happen when you ask kids what they'd like to wear instead of having adults telling them. I love this development, starting with the name. Was "Circo" the brand name for a kids' clothing line? Good grief. Look at the energy of "Cat & Jack!" And using real kids in the marketing is key. If consumer kids become the energy driving this brand, it's a winner.
  • Posted on: 07/08/2016

    Will new gen grocery stores cut waste down to zero?

    Thumbs up from me. I'm 100 percent with you Stephen though I wish a mere washing of produce were enough. Unfortunately what will really harm us is already "in" the plant, not "on" it. See my comment below. Some producers even brag about using "gray water" to irrigate their crops which is absorbed INTO the plant. If we listed what was in that gray water and where it actually came from, we'd never eat again. Hopefully soon we'll stop the madness.
  • Posted on: 07/08/2016

    Will new gen grocery stores cut waste down to zero?

    I couldn't be more thrilled or supportive of this movement. It's like we are finally waking up to what we're doing to our environment. Let's hope this catches on widely and wildly. Reducing waste is a noble goal but even beyond that, humankind simply must stop polluting everything it touches. I think it's all part of the same picture.For example, this fits with the growing chemical-free movement. Elsewhere recently I wrote an article about how we are under a 24/7 assault by man-made environmental factors. No matter what we eat, drink or do, including breathing, we are assaulted by chemicals. One study found out that only 1 percent of the pesticides sprayed on crops hits the intended target, 99 percent just goes into the air we breathe. Another study of common breakfast foods found that half had measurable glyphosate weedkiller. Eat up kids, breakfast is the most important meal of the day.We are responsible for this planet and are screwing it up royally.
  • Posted on: 07/06/2016

    Will getting rid of list prices help or hurt Amazon?

    This is really about truth. The worst kept secret in retail is that the MSRP or "regular" price is, with a few exceptions, pure BS. That is not at all to suggest Amazon merely makes up its comparative pricing; I'd be very disappointed if that were true. I see this as a truly "clean" approach and hope others follow suit.Anytime you can eliminate even the suspicion of dishonesty, manipulation and deception, do it. Transparency is one of the rarest practices in pretty well every dimension of our society. Wouldn't it be interesting (or immensely depressing) to know what's really going on, what the truth is, not only in retail but in agriculture, educational systems, religious organizations, the VA ... and particularly in our local, State and Federal governments? I won't even mention political campaigns!The ancient adage that "cleanliness is next to godliness" was not just about washing your hands, it was also about having a clean and truthful operation. Interestingly, you can make more money that way too.

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