PROFILE

Ian Percy

President, The Ian Percy Corporation

Ian Percy is a Possibilities Expert and the founder of The Infinite Possibilities Initiative, a process for applying principles from quantum and energetic science for exponentially higher levels of innovation and profitability. An organizational psychologist, he is one of the most acclaimed business and inspirational speakers in the world. Successful Meetings magazine declared him “One of the top 21 speakers for the 21st century” and he is one of only three speakers inducted into both the US and Canadian Speaker Halls of Fame. Ian’s remarkable ability to blend depth of insight with inspiration is sought after by a wide variety of corporations and associations.

Recently he’s developed a process that engages entire cities in ‘possibility thinking’ and in understanding that they control the collective ‘energy’ that attracts or repels new residents, investments and businesses. Many organizations are stuck in 16th century Newtonian thinking, he insists, and that makes them almost irrelevant to a 21st century marketplace. For starters, he says, we need to move far beyond ‘problem solving’ to ‘seeing possibilities’. When leaders focus on the latter, problems resolve themselves and a new and prosperous reality begins to emerge. That is the secret to building a culture of innovation!

In addition Ian is a co-founder of Verdant Technologies LLC, a company that brings advanced technologies to many sectors like sustainable energy, waste management, agriculture, water science, medical devices, electric vehicles. etc.

He has authored seven highly respected books including the breakthrough book on leadership titled: Going Deep and The Profitable Power of Purpose which challenges traditional thinking about corporate vision. His latest ebook is Make Your Life a Masterpiece, a modern English translation of James Allen’s 1902 classic As a Man Thinketh.

Ian has both Canadian and US citizenships and lives in Scottsdale, Arizona.

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  • Posted on: 02/16/2017

    What does it take to drive a top-down plan for customer-centricity?

    Bethune's book sounds well worth reading, Gene. Thanks. On point two about "measure, measure, measure," I'm hoping "They aren't what you think" alleviates my concern about being strangled by metrics. If management tries to measure the behaviors of those who, naturally out of their own heartfelt beliefs, truly put the customer first, and then turn those behaviors into an obligatory employee training program, I predict failure. Nothing kills love faster than trying to measure it and make people do it.To be clear, this is not an anti-measurement sentiment. We just need to measure the right things.
  • Posted on: 02/16/2017

    What does it take to drive a top-down plan for customer-centricity?

    "...corporate board rooms have little use for these traits in responding to Wall Street." You sure have that right Adrian! Well said.
  • Posted on: 02/16/2017

    What does it take to drive a top-down plan for customer-centricity?

    Hmmmm ... this phrase at the outset of this article kind of threw me: " ... change management initiatives work best when driven from the C-suite ... " Not sure how well that philosophy is working for the Oval Office, but I digress.There is no doubt that senior leadership commitment to a specific change is critical, but it's not usually senior leadership that serves customers. They are typically busy trying to appease shareholders who too often don't care how the money is made, just that it is made.There is a big difference between compliance with a customer-centric initiative and a commitment to it. Power can enforce compliance but no power is capable of forcing commitment. Commitment is a spiritual choice each individual has to make because they deeply believe the "change" or desired behavior and mindset will be worthy of that choice.Top-down change management doesn't work any better than a bottom-up strategy. The word "centric "means it come out of the center spreading out through every dimension of the organization. The trouble may be that a retail organization's, structures, systems, policies, hiring, training, choice, inventory, lighting, etc. are simply not congruent with the notion of customer-centricity. If some or all of those energies work against customer-centricity, it doesn't matter what is "driven" from on high. And don't even get me started on the word "driven!"
  • Posted on: 02/10/2017

    Is personalization better appreciated online or in stores?

    While I agree with both Bob and Mark about the "creepy" factor, I'll push it farther to say that whether it's face to face or online -- it's ALL creepy.Come on, does anyone who who gets their name automatically inserted into a message or who sees that some computer remembers everything you've ever bought actually think it's "personal?" If so that points to a very needy person!I use a local dry cleaner only when cleaning something really expensive because they are expensive. So let's say once a year max. The guy who takes my stuff at the drive through remembers my name every single time! And that's been going on for almost 20 years. Now THAT is personal!Everything else ... creepy.
  • Posted on: 02/09/2017

    Why in-store merchandising has to change

    Thanks for your kind comment, Lyle. My Skype handle includes the word "Why" so your emphasis on the "why" resonates with me. 'Why' is the operative word in logic it seems to me. Unfortunately it's too often ignored in retail thinking.
  • Posted on: 02/09/2017

    Why in-store merchandising has to change

    Super article, Mark. I'd like to listen to you explore the relation of "logic" to "efficiency and convenience." I'd learn a lot. And funny you played on "Who moved my cheese?"In Costco the other day I was trying to fulfill the assignment of picking up a certain cheese. After a futile and repeated search of the cheese section I finally gave up and asked for directions from a rarely-spotted employee. "Oh, that cheese is on the other side of the store," he said while pointing high over the ductwork. It's cheese! It goes in the cheese section! Sweet cheeses ... doesn't simple logic fit in here somewhere?
  • Posted on: 02/09/2017

    Did President Trump go too far with his Nordstrom tweet?

    I was going to wait to see what level of political innuendo would be tolerated here on RetailWire -- but what the heck. I noticed that Jon was able to "stop here" so maybe I can be as wise."Gone too far" can be applied on so many levels. With immigrants. With the disparagement of science, the environment, judicial system, financial de-regulation. With his career. This Nordstrom incident is beyond the pale, totally inappropriate. Let me be clear this has nothing to do with Republican-ism or with the Office of the President. It is 100 percent related to the man himself.And, as we're seeing, the explanation from Nordstrom reveals a rapidly fading brand at least as far as clothing goes. Bad.
  • Posted on: 01/26/2017

    Do retailers need to work on making more emotional connections?

    "I believe the alchemy of achieving this is largely beyond the control of the retailer/brand." Could not agree more, Mark.
  • Posted on: 01/26/2017

    Do retailers need to work on making more emotional connections?

    "Contriving such an alignment doesn’t work" - exactly!
  • Posted on: 01/26/2017

    Do retailers need to work on making more emotional connections?

    Oh my.According to someone's "BDI" assessment having an emotional, authentic and personal connection is really key. Another person "lamented" that retail has been too much about price and the bottom line rather than emotional connection. Heck, I'm feeling misty just writing this.The real purpose of this sentiment, this “extra, palpable bond?” Consumers will spend more and won't wait for specials. Isn't that what, a second ago, we were "lamenting?" Am I the only one feeling the phoniness in all this?And that whole "tribal" intent is not something you can strategize. It happens or it doesn't as a result of something far more ethereal than a customer love campaign. You can't make a tribe happen any more than you can make a video go viral. In fact, the more you try the more you seal its doom.Indian Motorcycles is a better story than Harley. It had been dead for what -- 40 years or so? And yet, spiritually, the "tribe" survived. That did not happen because of a corporate marketing strategy session.I'm sorry but I'm not feeling the love here. Opportunism maybe.
  • Posted on: 01/25/2017

    How soon before digital technologies reinvent food shopping?

    The main contribution this interactive technology could make pertaining to our food selection is in the promise of "including origins, nutritional facts, the presence of allergens ... " But that does not go nearly far enough. In the average American human body at least 29 pesticides are commonly measured. Where does that contamination come from? Mostly the foods we eat.Many will have seen the Inc. article warning us about strawberries we consume with such delight. The USDA warns that 13 pesticides are found in most strawberries. A friend with a doctorate in plant pathology tells me that strawberry fields are sprayed with fungicides and/or pesticides "every other day!"Seems to me that this "gamification" of our food selection is a very serious "game" indeed.
  • Posted on: 01/17/2017

    Sir Richard Branson at NRF: Are retailers looking outside the box?

    Totally on board with Paula and Jeff here. But in the current craziness of this country, where everyone "promises" with abandon and little actual thinking, it seems to me "the promise" won't cut it. We don't believe promises any more. As Jeff says, it's the "keeping" what we actually experience not what someone said we'd experience that means anything.
  • Posted on: 01/17/2017

    Sir Richard Branson at NRF: Are retailers looking outside the box?

    As I have said in more speeches than I can count, THERE IS NO BOX!This is a self-imposed and artificial limitation we made up out of fear. We're afraid to think for ourselves -- thus the addiction to "best practices." We're afraid to go first, to be different than others. And we are desperately afraid that we couldn't handle success."Looking outside the box" is pointless. As long as you can see it, you're still trapped in it.
  • Posted on: 01/16/2017

    Will blending online/offline roles improve the Walmart customer experience?

    You are so right, Ryan. There's always another shoe! And that "other shoe" will challenge mindsets and the human will. Sooner or later all technology ends up back as a very human issue.
  • Posted on: 01/16/2017

    Will blending online/offline roles improve the Walmart customer experience?

    If we've learned anything from nature, it's that everything is connected to everything. It just might be a good idea to follow nature's way.In our self-declared omnipotence we thought we knew better and in our need to control something — anything — we put people in boxes and silos, and then wondered why so much fell through the cracks and why employee engagement is at an all-time low.So yes, this is a good move "mechanistically" by Walmart. BUT this has to be more than a technological integration, it needs to be a visionary, psychological and perhaps spiritual integration as well. Just as Walmart is built on value, its customers want to be valued as well. Engagement of employees and customers is a choice made or not made at every turn.

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