PROFILE

Ian Percy

President, The Ian Percy Corporation

Ian Percy is a Possibilities Expert and the founder of The Infinite Possibilities Initiative, a process for applying principles from quantum and energetic science for exponentially higher levels of innovation and profitability. An organizational psychologist, he is one of the most acclaimed business and inspirational speakers in the world. Successful Meetings magazine declared him “One of the top 21 speakers for the 21st century” and he is one of only three speakers inducted into both the US and Canadian Speaker Halls of Fame. Ian’s remarkable ability to blend depth of insight with inspiration is sought after by a wide variety of corporations and associations.

Recently he’s developed a process that engages entire cities in ‘possibility thinking’ and in understanding that they control the collective ‘energy’ that attracts or repels new residents, investments and businesses. Many organizations are stuck in 16th century Newtonian thinking, he insists, and that makes them almost irrelevant to a 21st century marketplace. For starters, he says, we need to move far beyond ‘problem solving’ to ‘seeing possibilities’. When leaders focus on the latter, problems resolve themselves and a new and prosperous reality begins to emerge. That is the secret to building a culture of innovation!

In addition Ian is a co-founder of Verdant Technologies LLC, a company that brings advanced technologies to many sectors like sustainable energy, waste management, agriculture, water science, medical devices, electric vehicles. etc.

He has authored seven highly respected books including the breakthrough book on leadership titled: Going Deep and The Profitable Power of Purpose which challenges traditional thinking about corporate vision. His latest ebook is Make Your Life a Masterpiece, a modern English translation of James Allen’s 1902 classic As a Man Thinketh.

Ian has both Canadian and US citizenships and lives in Scottsdale, Arizona.

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  • Posted on: 11/08/2016

    Is PetSmart barking up the right/wrong tree with same-day delivery?

    Bob, your comment about how a place treats your pet reminds me of something I learned a long time ago. If there's an occasion where an appreciation gift is appropriate, I always try to buy the person either something for their kids or something for their pet. That is valued and remembered much longer than your typical corporate gift. Of course that requires you do a little research to make sure your gift fits. We've had dinner guests who instead of, or in addition to, bringing the usual bottle of wine will bring a toy for the dog. I couldn't tell you anything about the wine brought last weekend, but I can tell you where every dog toy came from.
  • Posted on: 11/08/2016

    Is PetSmart barking up the right/wrong tree with same-day delivery?

    "My same-day delivery is faster than your same-day delivery!" Sounds like more schoolyard bragging!I just don't get this "need" for fast delivery unless you were getting a heart transplant. If you haven't fed your dog for a few days because you ran out of food, go down to the store and buy the poor thing some food! Second, give the dog to someone smarter and more caring than you. I'm with Lee. Our dog Blu lacks for nothing. Our big bag of dog food is delivered about a week before we need it -- for free.This is just a big company with Amazon-envy playing "me too."
  • Posted on: 11/03/2016

    Are moms too busy for in-store ads?

    Heck, we're ALL too busy to be bothered with ads while trying to get shopping done. Multiply that time 10 if a mom has kids in tow.Kim is right. As we do with pretty well everything, we take it to such an extreme that we kill it or at least create a backlash. Facebook has announced that its ad capacity is full. That is such a sad observation for all of us and eventually it will be for shareholders too. Soon we'll be interrupting ads and commercials to actually do what we need to do or watch five minutes of a program.Doug is also right about communicating before the customer even leaves for the store. That's how Safeway's Just For You program works and works extremely well in my house. We'll actually make a trip just to get that stuff!I'm as tired of constant ads as I am this election!
  • Posted on: 11/03/2016

    Will one CEO be better than two for Whole Foods?

    The last question we've been asked to respond to is the most important. But first to the first one. In almost all cases there needs to be a leader. Otherwise incredible amounts of time and angst are spent determining which one you need to win over in order to launch an innovation or even do your job.That said, My friend David Thomson wrote "Blueprint to a Billion" a few years back on how to take a business into the top echelon of their industry. One of the qualities is a dual leadership, but not a co-CEO set up. One leader, Thomson suggests, must be distinctly internally focused and the other externally focused. It doesn't work if both try to do both.So is Mackey THE CHOSEN ONE? Ken's comment above gives me pause. And frankly the "organic" distinction is so yesterday. That is not the battle ground. A new space far beyond "organic" needs to be identified and branded.
  • Posted on: 11/01/2016

    Will integrating plus-size clothing boost Meijer’s apparel sales?

    I agree with Chris. Just the term "plus-size" is demeaning, it seems to me. There's a viral video pointing out the average size for women's clothing is 16 to 18 in the U.S. If that is the the midpoint, shouldn't size 2, 4, etc. be labelled "minus-sizes?" Of course, the most thoughtful thing to do is simply have a range of sizes without judgement and let it go at that. Seems that's what Meijer is doing and good for them.Pricing things by the amount of material would be a nightmare. The only way you could get away with that is to have an outlet selling only large sizes where you could charge more because there's nothing small to compare the price to. But even then among large sizes it would be a poor strategy to set price by size.
  • Posted on: 10/27/2016

    Will branded services help lift Staples’ results?

    Just went through the exact same thing, Camille. Before I saw your post, I was thinking of how nice it would be to have a "Your Perfect Office" store where there was evidence of creativity in what an attire active, functional office could look like for $500, another for $2,000, etc. The chairs and desks were just thrown in like it was a salvage warehouse.
  • Posted on: 10/27/2016

    Will branded services help lift Staples’ results?

    Boy, the Staples strategy is going to be a stretch to be sure. Both stores basically sell office stuff, pretty well the exact same stuff and at pretty well the exact same price. They sell staples and should stick with that.In my experience both stores have good employees but neither store is stocked with truly knowledgeable salespeople who can do much more than see if they "have one in the back." So for Staples to expand the "brand" into financial and high-level technical advice will be quite the trick. Kind of like the National Enquirer having a marriage advice column. If they do try it, they should rename it.It is almost impossible for anyone to own this space.
  • Posted on: 10/25/2016

    Is time running out on smartwatches?

    Sometimes the problem is also the solution. For me smartwatches are just too much work. 90 percent of the time I just want to know what time it is. And for many of us who are closet seniors, you just can't read the damn things.Jitesh Ubrani is right on the money: make the things provide a simple solution to a single problem.
  • Posted on: 10/19/2016

    Will Apple turn its stores into something more than stores?

    Doug, you give us a good reminder that EVERYTHING in existence -- human-made or not -- is on an inescapable life-cycle. There's birth, growth, maturity and then you die. (I used to be a motivational speaker.) Our tendency in business is to think that a successful "maturity" stage will live forever. It won't. At the front edge of maturing, even in the growth stage, is the time to reinvent. Thanks for this insight.
  • Posted on: 10/19/2016

    Will Apple turn its stores into something more than stores?

    Like Starbucks and Panera Bread, I thought Apple stores were already mini town squares.Another good article from George that has me wondering what other retail operations lend themselves to this model of being a gathering place. Not many I suspect. Hard to imagine that happening in a Walmart or Target.The other advantage for Apple town squares is that a purchase generated by being part of the community is darn profitable. Contrast that to the tables for four at Starbucks and Panera Bread that are occupied for hours by a single person who spent under $3 to be there. That's all those squatters will ever spend -- and that can't be good for the bottom line.
  • Posted on: 10/18/2016

    Walmart finds it pays to pay workers better

    George's first sentence pretty well wraps up the discussion for me. This is the epitome of Psychology 101.
  • Posted on: 10/14/2016

    Target to test vertical farms in stores

    You are right about improving production, Ben. As you and I have discussed, there are ways to significantly accelerate and improve the growth cycle of plants by changing the resonance of the water. It normally takes 28 days to mature a head of lettuce and it's possible to reduce that by five or six days while improving quality. That means going quicker to market which can increase margins considerably.Gotta love those grow lights! Actually, as I've learned lately, those lights have advanced considerably!
  • Posted on: 10/14/2016

    Target to test vertical farms in stores

    You are right to be anxious about traditional field farming, Robert. But as a matter of fact, hydroponics is becoming hot stuff for Millennials. We've ruined most arable soil. We've sprayed (poisoned) everything we can reach. Fortunately this approach does not need pesticides or non-organic chemicals at all. There are a number of companies providing turnkey hydroponic facilities.
  • Posted on: 10/14/2016

    Target to test vertical farms in stores

    YES! YES! YES!I've suggested that on RetailWire several times. This is a movement and if you are at all connected to food, pay attention. Many of the major chefs on the Las Vegas strip are so fed up (sorry) with the quality of produce that they're supporting a major hydroponic operation to be set up right among them. Senior facilities, schools and residences will rapidly be doing this as well. Restaurants and grocery stores have got to get involved. Imagine a salad you eat minutes from being harvested!We can get 20 varieties of lettuce from a couple who have a trailer turned into a hydroponic station and the difference is amazing. We don't even bother to wash it.This item makes my weekend (unless the Arizona Cardinals lose again).Just one caveat: Not all hydroponic operations are equal. There is complex water and plant science behind this approach and you need to know what you're doing.
  • Posted on: 10/13/2016

    Will greeters make Penney a more inviting place to shop?

    The encouragement to do actual research is well stated, Mark. The part I need help with is the the definition of "conversion." Does that mean I got what I came in for or that I bought more than I intended? I've done a lot of research over the years but I don't see how you can eliminate other variables (like product availability, price, etc.) and attribute my purchase to being greeted. I'm not at all being critical, I have a feeling you know a lot more about this than I do.

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