PROFILE

Ian Percy

President, The Ian Percy Corporation

Ian Percy is a Possibilities Expert and the founder of The Infinite Possibilities Initiative, a process for applying principles from quantum and energetic science for exponentially higher levels of innovation and profitability. An organizational psychologist, he is one of the most acclaimed business and inspirational speakers in the world. Successful Meetings magazine declared him “One of the top 21 speakers for the 21st century” and he is one of only three speakers inducted into both the US and Canadian Speaker Halls of Fame. Ian’s remarkable ability to blend depth of insight with inspiration is sought after by a wide variety of corporations and associations.

Recently he’s developed a process that engages entire cities in ‘possibility thinking’ and in understanding that they control the collective ‘energy’ that attracts or repels new residents, investments and businesses. Many organizations are stuck in 16th century Newtonian thinking, he insists, and that makes them almost irrelevant to a 21st century marketplace. For starters, he says, we need to move far beyond ‘problem solving’ to ‘seeing possibilities’. When leaders focus on the latter, problems resolve themselves and a new and prosperous reality begins to emerge. That is the secret to building a culture of innovation!

In addition Ian is a co-founder of Verdant Technologies LLC, a company that brings advanced technologies to many sectors like sustainable energy, waste management, agriculture, water science, medical devices, electric vehicles. etc.

He has authored seven highly respected books including the breakthrough book on leadership titled: Going Deep and The Profitable Power of Purpose which challenges traditional thinking about corporate vision. His latest ebook is Make Your Life a Masterpiece, a modern English translation of James Allen’s 1902 classic As a Man Thinketh.

Ian has both Canadian and US citizenships and lives in Scottsdale, Arizona.

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  • Posted on: 09/22/2016

    What happens when managers unintentionally demotivate employees?

    SO glad someone else is pointing this out Doug. Same goes for performance appraisals!
  • Posted on: 09/22/2016

    What happens when managers unintentionally demotivate employees?

    We need to have a new understanding of the "motivational" thing.First, EVERYONE is motivated to do precisely what they are doing. They do that because in their mind it's better than not doing it. Doesn't matter if we agree with the logic of it all or not. Anyone who has raised a teenager understands this point. Managers/leaders are to create an environment that gives room for people to be who and what they desire to be; their "reason to be," if you will. Their destiny to be grand about it. That environment is often called "culture."Sometimes that reason is aligned with a retail experience and sometimes not. The problem is we may think we know what retail can offer, but we haven't a clue what our employees are looking for out of their life. The end result is it's just a job and many managers do the dumb selfish things mentioned in the article because they don't know what they want out of their lives either.Second, "motivation" is primarily a matter of getting out of the way. As we've all experienced, managers are primarily in the way. Sad but too often true. A plant will grow to its maximum potential all by itself -- IF it is put in the right environment. If that works for a simple plant, why wouldn't it work for people too?
  • Posted on: 09/21/2016

    Is a trendless fashion industry killing Gap’s business?

    The term "trendless" (Is that even possible?) is a puzzling one best explored toward the end of Friday's Happy Hour. However I will jump the gun in anticipation.Futurist Dan Burrus says there are "hard trends" and "soft trends." Hard trends are developments, innovations, styles or whatever that will certainly happen whether you want them to or not. They are predictable. We can see them coming. They are based on facts not assumptions. And they can't be stopped. Cashless commerce or driver-less cars might be two examples. Soft trends are those that might happen, maybe even look like they're going to happen. Soft trends are based on assumptions and guesses and are not a future fact.Burrus concludes that the game-changer -- the ultimate differentiator we all long for -- is knowing how to tell the hard from the soft. Whichever retailer learns how to do that owns the future. The problem for Gap and everyone else in clothing and fashion is that they are trapped in the sinking sand of soft trends. It's all a big guess as to what will work or not work. What will endure long enough to get through inventory and what will end by the weekend.Could it be that the only hard trend retail has created for itself is discounting/low cost? That's the future game whether we like it or not. It no longer can be stopped.
  • Posted on: 09/20/2016

    Unilever makes ‘purpose-driven’ deal for Seventh Generation

    At first glance this sounds like a conversion experience so how can we but applaud. Still I wonder what the other option is to being "purpose-driven." This is like companies who list "honesty" as one of their corporate values. What exactly is the other choice?I wrote a book on corporations being purpose-driven so I'm in the choir. But the brutal reality is that every company is purpose-driven. Sadly many of those "purposes" are destroying us. Still, this is great and encouraging news.
  • Posted on: 09/19/2016

    Amazon’s Prime Now delivers beauty in a hurry

    Excellent point about the gauntlet Max. You make me think. Here's where I think that challenge strategy has weakness. First, I've found that Amazon consumers who get a product in an hour or two or even the same day like to marvel and brag that it happened. When asked if they actually needed it that fast I've never heard anything other than no. So if that act is just to fire a shot over the bow of the lesser retailers -- as distinct from being driven by real market demand -- it may begin to unravel rather quickly.And if retailers pick up the gauntlet they are likely to try and out-deliver Amazon. Generally most organizations suck at innovation as reflected in the "best practice" mentality. We're pretty well a bunch of mimickers. Coming up with true original innovations that differentiates an operation from all others is a daunting task.
  • Posted on: 09/19/2016

    Amazon’s Prime Now delivers beauty in a hurry

    I guess the answer to the question "Why?" is "Because we can."I am struggling to imagine a reason why one would just have to have a beauty product delivered in an hour. Perhaps we should put a carbon tax on the delivery.
  • Posted on: 09/14/2016

    Should grocers back away from prepared meals?

    Maybe Frank is right ... perhaps grocers, restaurants, etc., should stay in their own lane. That way you are more likely to have control over your environment and processes.But this foodborne illness issue gets down to two things: a.) What exactly do you mean by "fresh?" And, while we're at it, what exactly do you mean by "minimally processed?" When it comes to the majority of our food, marketing efforts to the contrary, we are generally feasting on chemical soup. Just because your lettuce was picked yesterday doesn't mean it isn't infused with lord-knows-what. 70 percent of the world's agricultural top soil is either dead, contaminated or has disappeared entirely. And according to National Geographic, only about 11 percent of Earth's land surface is suitable for farming.The answer I'm seeing is that hydroponic operations will become the major food source especially for the prepared meal category. Every restaurant and grocery store, or co-ops of same, will soon have their own hydroponic facilities. So will schools, senior facilities, hospitals, etc.And b.) we need to rethink what we're using to clean all surfaces involved in processing food. Illogically we tend to use poisons to get rid of potential contaminants. It's like someone offering you arsenic to get rid of your lead poisoning. I'm working on the fringes of this issue and know that there are new and truly organic and safe solutions that are far more effective than the traditional "disinfectants." Just that word makes me woozy.The net lesson is we need to stop blindly doing what has always been done and open eyes and minds to new insights and innovations.
  • Posted on: 09/09/2016

    Is altruism the secret ingredient in Starbucks’ success?

    Once again, Adrian, we are totally aligned in our thinking. Many times I think formal PR strategies get in the way of stories that move people to action. Like listening to political surrogates on TV!
  • Posted on: 09/09/2016

    Is altruism the secret ingredient in Starbucks’ success?

    In this forum we often talk about the "experience economy" -- how people need to feel like they're part of something. That's simply another way of inviting our employees and customers to be part of our story. The truth is it's ALWAYS about the story. Store. Story. Same thing.For example, just this morning I read the story behind the "no-logo" all-wool sneakers made by a few ordinary guys in New Zealand that are "taking Silicon Valley by storm." This is a story the ordinary person can feel a part of. You can't feel like you're "part of" Nike ... you're not a celebrity.The definition of "story" includes: a.) a recounting of treasured history; b.) an appealing recital of true events; c.) a description of a fictitious event meant to entertain; d.) a euphemism for a lie; or e.) a sad truth. What each retailer has to decide is, which type of story does your operation tell or want to tell?The question is, are retailers storytellers at heart? It's the "at heart" part that is problematic. You have and are telling a story ... good or bad, that is not an option. "At heart" implies that you have something central to your life that you must get out, something that will reach, touch and uplift the hearts of those listening. Sadly, most retailers don't have that kind of story -- at least not at the ready.To find your "at heart" story you have to go back to the who, what, when, where and why of how your operation started in the first place. Tell the story of your great grandmother who raised six kids by herself while starting the first store, about where the original recipe came from or about how the triple-link stitch used in your suits was invented exactly 100 years ago.Among us it may be Tony Orlando who has the best stories. For instance if you want him to publish his family's legendary lasagna recipe and the story behind it, please reply to this submission with your request!
  • Posted on: 09/07/2016

    What does it take to earn Millennials’ loyalty?

    You said it better than I did, Adrian. Exactly the point.
  • Posted on: 09/07/2016

    What does it take to earn Millennials’ loyalty?

    I agree with the first three points with this caveat: they describe how Millennials tend to behave and experience the world, but they do NOT describe a loyalty strategy by any stretch. They simply describe how Millennials work and if you want their attention at all, this is how you play the game. Zero to do with loyalty -- that is a past-generational concept. Maybe two generations ago. I heard a very senior General on CNN this morning describing how we should apply a WWII strategy against ISIS. That is what many marketers are doing in the retail war.The fourth point kind of confirms what I just said about applying an old model. Way back when Amex created the various levels of credit cards we all admired people who had "a gold card" not realizing that they just paid more for it and had higher debt. It also meant you ended up buying lunch more often. A phony "status" does not impress any one. Millennials aren't clamoring to be "the best" ... they're clamoring to be themselves. So should we all.
  • Posted on: 09/01/2016

    Amazon to test 30-hour week

    I think we all know that time and actual productivity are not correlated in any combination.I do find it amusing that Amazon is starting with managers and corporate people. These are the folks who sit in endless meetings, typically between 35 and 50 percent of their work week. Another four hours per week is spent preparing -- or getting braced -- for those meetings. This article suggests that 67 percent of meeting time is useless.So let's say on average that's 11 hours PER WEEK of wasted, non-productive time caused by this one factor. Not only that, but that wasted time exhausts the energy and thinking needed for non-meeting work like innovation, communication, team-building, customer service and actual leadership.There's a reason Happy Hour starts AFTER work. Gallup tells us that 71 percent of most folks aren't very happy in their work so merely shortening the work week ain't going to do much other than cut your pay. Of course, those of us with an entrepreneurial bent wish everyone else would stop whining about how "hard and long" they work. You have no idea.
  • Posted on: 08/31/2016

    Is good karma the newest customer reward?

    I'm not sure how the examples given are "non-monetary," but let's let that go for the moment.It may be because I have a meeting today about social capitalism and how we can help millions of kids all over the world actually have food to eat that I make these comments. So rather than "Adam just sent you $10" you get a note that you've provided lunch for six children today, which you can do for the same $10. Lest your mind goes to remote mud huts in Africa, 48.1 million Americans lived in "food insecure" households, including 15.3 million children. ("Food insecure" is the PC language for malnutrition if not starvation ... right here in the USA.) If we're going for karma ... let's go for KARMA!
  • Posted on: 08/29/2016

    ConAgra, Unilever mull delivering meals to the home

    I keep hitting the thumbs-up icon, Anne, but it won't add any. I'd just say you are too kind in referring only to sugar and sodium additives. I was thinking more of glyphosate (weedkiller).
  • Posted on: 08/29/2016

    ConAgra, Unilever mull delivering meals to the home

    I was going to rant on about the foolish "me too" mentality that seems to pervade our business communities. My goodness, come up with your own breakthrough ideas! We already have five times too many providers of pretty much everything.However, having read Anne's comment above, I have nothing further to say and yield my time to her. I can just see it now: "Monsanto Meals" delivered to your home. Their competitive advantage? Shelf life!

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