PROFILE

Ian Percy

President, The Ian Percy Corporation

Ian Percy is a Possibilities Expert and the founder of The Infinite Possibilities Initiative, a process for applying principles from quantum and energetic science for exponentially higher levels of innovation and profitability. An organizational psychologist, he is one of the most acclaimed business and inspirational speakers in the world. Successful Meetings magazine declared him “One of the top 21 speakers for the 21st century” and he is one of only three speakers inducted into both the US and Canadian Speaker Halls of Fame. Ian’s remarkable ability to blend depth of insight with inspiration is sought after by a wide variety of corporations and associations.

Recently he’s developed a process that engages entire cities in ‘possibility thinking’ and in understanding that they control the collective ‘energy’ that attracts or repels new residents, investments and businesses. Many organizations are stuck in 16th century Newtonian thinking, he insists, and that makes them almost irrelevant to a 21st century marketplace. For starters, he says, we need to move far beyond ‘problem solving’ to ‘seeing possibilities’. When leaders focus on the latter, problems resolve themselves and a new and prosperous reality begins to emerge. That is the secret to building a culture of innovation!

In addition Ian is a co-founder of Verdant Technologies LLC, a company that brings advanced technologies to many sectors like sustainable energy, waste management, agriculture, water science, medical devices, electric vehicles. etc.

He has authored seven highly respected books including the breakthrough book on leadership titled: Going Deep and The Profitable Power of Purpose which challenges traditional thinking about corporate vision. His latest ebook is Make Your Life a Masterpiece, a modern English translation of James Allen’s 1902 classic As a Man Thinketh.

Ian has both Canadian and US citizenships and lives in Scottsdale, Arizona.

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  • Posted on: 01/17/2017

    Sir Richard Branson at NRF: Are retailers looking outside the box?

    Totally on board with Paula and Jeff here. But in the current craziness of this country, where everyone "promises" with abandon and little actual thinking, it seems to me "the promise" won't cut it. We don't believe promises any more. As Jeff says, it's the "keeping" what we actually experience not what someone said we'd experience that means anything.
  • Posted on: 01/17/2017

    Sir Richard Branson at NRF: Are retailers looking outside the box?

    As I have said in more speeches than I can count, THERE IS NO BOX!This is a self-imposed and artificial limitation we made up out of fear. We're afraid to think for ourselves -- thus the addiction to "best practices." We're afraid to go first, to be different than others. And we are desperately afraid that we couldn't handle success."Looking outside the box" is pointless. As long as you can see it, you're still trapped in it.
  • Posted on: 01/16/2017

    Will blending online/offline roles improve the Walmart customer experience?

    You are so right, Ryan. There's always another shoe! And that "other shoe" will challenge mindsets and the human will. Sooner or later all technology ends up back as a very human issue.
  • Posted on: 01/16/2017

    Will blending online/offline roles improve the Walmart customer experience?

    If we've learned anything from nature, it's that everything is connected to everything. It just might be a good idea to follow nature's way.In our self-declared omnipotence we thought we knew better and in our need to control something — anything — we put people in boxes and silos, and then wondered why so much fell through the cracks and why employee engagement is at an all-time low.So yes, this is a good move "mechanistically" by Walmart. BUT this has to be more than a technological integration, it needs to be a visionary, psychological and perhaps spiritual integration as well. Just as Walmart is built on value, its customers want to be valued as well. Engagement of employees and customers is a choice made or not made at every turn.
  • Posted on: 01/09/2017

    Will PetSmart’s luxurious Pet Spa concept catch on?

    Lee, I think we're kin when it comes to our dogs! I always appreciate your comments.
  • Posted on: 01/09/2017

    Will PetSmart’s luxurious Pet Spa concept catch on?

    As usual, we'll stretch something to the breaking point and then we destroy what we had in the first place. But yes, people will pay.Around here just the "normal" cost of basic grooming (fundamentally a bath and blow-dry) is hitting $150. Or about a year and a half of haircuts for me! What's the new luxury version going to cost -- $200? $250? It takes me about 15 minutes to bathe my dog and trim her nails. She has zero interest in the process and cooperates only for the treat at the end. But my point is that's equivalent to $600 an hour even at the low rate. No doubt about it ... I'm in the wrong business!I love my dog and frankly think dogs are how you know there's a God. And, as I preach to myself, wouldn't it be great if we could manage to give our pets all the love we've got, and send the two-hundred bucks to a mom trying to find food for her kid? If the treat is still there, my dog would love that.
  • Posted on: 01/04/2017

    Should workers have the right to disconnect?

    Yours may be the best comment today, Nikki!
  • Posted on: 01/04/2017

    Should workers have the right to disconnect?

    I'm interested in the term "right." As in "inalienable rights."According to Wikipedia, "Natural rights are those that are not dependent on the laws or customs of any particular culture or government, and therefore universal and inalienable." In short they cannot be given or taken away. In suggesting that the employee has no life outside of and away from work, we see a reversion to a slavish relationship where life is dictated by someone who can hurt or reward you according to your performance. Now out of the goodness of their heart, lawmakers have to step in and "free" the employees to live their own lives. Max is right to imply the question: "This takes a law?"It's more than merely checking business email.Not getting away from work has ruined a lot of lives and families. A while back, a 28-year-old female employee in a Japanese advertising agency committed suicide because she could no longer tolerate the 24/7 claim on her life. She clocked 105 hours of overtime in the month leading up to her death ... on Christmas Day 2015. The agency's CEO immediately resigned, I assume because of guilt. It's "work to live," people, the reverse doesn't end well.
  • Posted on: 01/03/2017

    How can retailers make online reviews more useful?

    Like pretty well every "news item" these days you have to take product and service reviews with caution. Sadly we're getting to the point where trust is pretty well an endangered value.There are all kinds of ways to manipulate and organize feedback data. The public, plain and simple, are at the mercy of the retailer. I needed pool service lately, and the one company assigned the job by my home warranty provider had a highly disproportionate number of negative reviews and four complaints to the BBB including one charge of fraud! Neither the home warranty people nor the pool service seemed to care, explaining "that's just the way the internet is these days."On a related issue, I get annoyed when questioned about the very basic levels of service or quality. This is a desperate grab for a "five star" ratings which, no matter how it's earned, lifts the average. It's almost to the point where they expect a five star rating in response to the question "Did the light bulb light up when you switched it on?"It seems to me there are two essential questions: 1.) In what ways did this product or service exceed your expectations? and; 2.) In what ways did this product or service not meet your expectations? (Note: that's different than pros and cons.) If it did what it was supposed to do and what I paid for, I don't bother responding to surveys. Three star ratings are pointless.
  • Posted on: 12/05/2016

    Can facial-recognition assist in gift giving?

    Algorithms rule! Love, creativity and surprise are passé. Santa replaced by drones.Sad, don't you think? What we're doing to technologically mechanize what is supposedly the most personal, giving, considerate, unifying and loving time of the year?"Risk" is part of the gift-giving experience. Would s/he love this or that? It's testing your connection and intimacy with another human you genuinely care about. Nothing feels better than if they absolutely LOVE a gift you personally choose for them. That's what makes your heart beat faster.
  • Posted on: 11/08/2016

    Is PetSmart barking up the right/wrong tree with same-day delivery?

    Bob, your comment about how a place treats your pet reminds me of something I learned a long time ago. If there's an occasion where an appreciation gift is appropriate, I always try to buy the person either something for their kids or something for their pet. That is valued and remembered much longer than your typical corporate gift. Of course that requires you do a little research to make sure your gift fits. We've had dinner guests who instead of, or in addition to, bringing the usual bottle of wine will bring a toy for the dog. I couldn't tell you anything about the wine brought last weekend, but I can tell you where every dog toy came from.
  • Posted on: 11/08/2016

    Is PetSmart barking up the right/wrong tree with same-day delivery?

    "My same-day delivery is faster than your same-day delivery!" Sounds like more schoolyard bragging!I just don't get this "need" for fast delivery unless you were getting a heart transplant. If you haven't fed your dog for a few days because you ran out of food, go down to the store and buy the poor thing some food! Second, give the dog to someone smarter and more caring than you. I'm with Lee. Our dog Blu lacks for nothing. Our big bag of dog food is delivered about a week before we need it -- for free.This is just a big company with Amazon-envy playing "me too."
  • Posted on: 11/03/2016

    Are moms too busy for in-store ads?

    Heck, we're ALL too busy to be bothered with ads while trying to get shopping done. Multiply that time 10 if a mom has kids in tow.Kim is right. As we do with pretty well everything, we take it to such an extreme that we kill it or at least create a backlash. Facebook has announced that its ad capacity is full. That is such a sad observation for all of us and eventually it will be for shareholders too. Soon we'll be interrupting ads and commercials to actually do what we need to do or watch five minutes of a program.Doug is also right about communicating before the customer even leaves for the store. That's how Safeway's Just For You program works and works extremely well in my house. We'll actually make a trip just to get that stuff!I'm as tired of constant ads as I am this election!
  • Posted on: 11/03/2016

    Will one CEO be better than two for Whole Foods?

    The last question we've been asked to respond to is the most important. But first to the first one. In almost all cases there needs to be a leader. Otherwise incredible amounts of time and angst are spent determining which one you need to win over in order to launch an innovation or even do your job.That said, My friend David Thomson wrote "Blueprint to a Billion" a few years back on how to take a business into the top echelon of their industry. One of the qualities is a dual leadership, but not a co-CEO set up. One leader, Thomson suggests, must be distinctly internally focused and the other externally focused. It doesn't work if both try to do both.So is Mackey THE CHOSEN ONE? Ken's comment above gives me pause. And frankly the "organic" distinction is so yesterday. That is not the battle ground. A new space far beyond "organic" needs to be identified and branded.
  • Posted on: 11/01/2016

    Will integrating plus-size clothing boost Meijer’s apparel sales?

    I agree with Chris. Just the term "plus-size" is demeaning, it seems to me. There's a viral video pointing out the average size for women's clothing is 16 to 18 in the U.S. If that is the the midpoint, shouldn't size 2, 4, etc. be labelled "minus-sizes?" Of course, the most thoughtful thing to do is simply have a range of sizes without judgement and let it go at that. Seems that's what Meijer is doing and good for them.Pricing things by the amount of material would be a nightmare. The only way you could get away with that is to have an outlet selling only large sizes where you could charge more because there's nothing small to compare the price to. But even then among large sizes it would be a poor strategy to set price by size.

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